long shot : mind binding question about bandsaw

Ok, I've settled my choice on a delta 14". But in their catalog there is a 3/4 & 1 HP model. So here's my 2 questions
1) Would it make a big difference to use a 3/4 HP instead of a 1 HP ? Is a smaller motor tend to break the blade more often ?
2) Digging a bit further, I saw another brand of bandsaw (King Industrial) where they don't show the HP but rather the amps : it was a 7.5 amps for the 3/4 HP and 10 amps for the other. So as we know, Watts = Voltage x Intensity 120Vx7.5A0W to convert it to HP = Watts x 0,00134. So a 7.5A gives 1.2 HP and a 10A gives 1.6 HP. I'm sure I missing something here, I would doubt very much that they gives so much HP for a small bandsaw like that. Any electrician in the croud ?
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Big, no, but more is better. 3/4 HP would be "tested" by significant resawing but plenty for sawing wood in the thin direction.

No, but it may bug down or stall it a really thick cut.

the
Not an electrician but.... Your math is essentially correct except 120 is the nominal voltage household electricity. 110-115v is more realistic. Your math does not account for the inefficiencies of the motor. 1HP motors tend to be about 9-10 amps. HP ratings have been known to be stretched by the marketing departments of some tool manufacturers. Amps are a much more objective yardstick IMHO.
Steve
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C & S wrote:

It's not true. My shop vac delivers 6.8 HP because it says so on the sticker, and because it's printed on a sticker, it MUST be true. I also have a 5 HP router that runs on batteries.
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Along these lines, the sticker amount is the maximum HP or current at the millisecond before the motor detonates into colourful red, orange and black flames..

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Ok, your are right and remembered my electric courses. It's the cos phi factor which is essentially the true efficacy of an electrical apparel. For motors, it ranges from 0,5 to 0,9 essentially. What I didn't know is that cheap motors (chinese) don't show HP but only amps because they are... well crap motors. Torque is so low and they don't use capacitors so it jams every so often. That would explain the pain I have to drill a 3/4" hole in oak on my Mastercraft press drill.
So, as always, don't just look at the mechanics of the tools but also at the electrical parts also.
It changed my mind on the bandsaw.

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On Fri, 21 Jan 2005 20:17:54 -0500, "Junkyard Engineer"
Ratings on cheap motors lie. As a measure of usable power, you're as well off by weighing them.
All other things being equal, I'd pay a small amount extra to get the bigger motor. But check if it's a standard fitting anyway (most are) - you might be able to re-motor it quite simply anyway.
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On Fri, 21 Jan 2005 20:17:54 -0500, "Junkyard Engineer"

Why would it break the blade more often? If you're going to be resawing stock, go for the more powerful motor- if you're just going to be cutting shapes in 4/4 lumber, then you'll do just fine with the smaller.
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