Log Loading Ramp for trailer??

Question: Has anyone seen a good design for a "log loading ramp" to go on the back of a trailer, when winching good sized logs out in the woods?? I just built a "wood gathering trailer", and the winch mount I built fits on the rear Class 4 hitch on my GMC Yukon, and has a trailer hitch on IT so I can winch onto the trailer. It's already MUCH easier than loading wood up at the pickup bed level, which I've done for years. BUT there's that "Get one end of the log up onto the trailer" part. I once saw a photo of a drop-on ramp that would 'help' the log up and was moveable right-to-left for different logs in a load. But I don't remember it well...
Anyone seen or built one, before I try to invent one?? It needs to have somewhat of a Vee shape, to guide a log end up and on... I think. Large round tubing is what I got, other steel I can get. Cut, weld, and like that.
I'll post a pointer to the whole deal when I get it all working. Which better be soon.
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Regards, Terry King ...In The Woods In Vermont
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Advantage to the snowmobile trailer which tilts. Tongs and a comealong do it all.
If I didn't have that, I'd rig a piece of sheet goods with a couple of hooks to fit in the tailgate pockets. Or an A frame which, when winched at the apex, would raise the end of the log and sling it toward the trailer. There's also a cant hook with a leg type thing for bucking that might lift high enough. Can't remember the name just now, but most logging/firewood places should have an idea.

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OK, it's called a log lifter - doh!
http://www.logsplitters-ironoak.com/lifter.html

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One of the tricks logers use (which you never think about) is that they drag the small end of the log first. The big end would dig into the ground but because of the shape, the small end tends to skid.
On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 16:21:27 GMT, "George"

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I've thought about buying a small hand-crane and mounting it on the back of my trailer for things like this. Here's one at Harbor Freight that goes on sale quite often:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber7555
Lance
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I use one of my car loading ramps...works fine. I have used a board also. It doesn't take much, just some low sides to help keep the log from rolling off. I put the ramp in front of the log when the log is up close and I can see where it wants to go. I use an electric winch, 5K rating, mounted on the front of the trailer bed, 16' long. I also usually charge the battery while working, with a small generator. The drain of winches that size is wicked and I'm going to change to gasoline someday.
But I can load 2' oak, at least one layer. I do all sorts of jackleg tricks to get the second layer!
Wilson

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Use regular slide out ramps and put them on the side of your trailer. Drag the logs up beside the trailer and roll them right on up. The old timers used to load logs like that with mules or horses way back when. You may need to use a pully on the off side of your trailer to 90 the winch cable. Go OVER the log and back to the side of your trailer with the cable and the log will roll right on up the ramps. If you have side rails get ready for you log to fall into your trailer though. My trailer is a flat bed and I have loaded up to 3 layers of logs this way. Bind the bottom layer b'4 adding another layer though.
jack
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Thanks for lots of good ideas, guys!
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Regards, Terry King ...In The Woods In Vermont
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Well I went the unconventional method and load my logs on my flatbed fro the side. I have 2 short ramps than come dwon from the side of the trailer to the ground. They are detachable. I have a wich mounted o the opposite side opf the trailer. I pull the trailer up alongside the logs or roll the logs along the trailer, layout a sling made of cable, that is attached to the same side of the trailer as the ramps are. Each end of this cable is attached on the tailer side, about 8 feet apart. The I lay out this looped sling on the ground, and roll a long onto it, or use a log lifter to raise up one end and place the cablesling under the log,, and attach the wiches cable to the central point of this sling, turn on the winch and roll the log up the ramps and onto the trailers bed. ONce its on the bed, roll it to the far side, and repeat the process. Before I added the winch I used to use a small tractor for the pulling power, easier than winching them the length of the trailer and having to get the end up on the trailer. Even with a tilt bed trailer, each log loaded makes it that much harder to load the next and then get the bed back down again.
Of course this will only work if you have a flat bed, unless you make some kind of setup to allow it to roll up and over fenders or a low bedrail, but its still doable. Ramps don;t have to be long either.
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