Loctite for wood screws?

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RayV wrote:

I'd try a tiny dab of polyurethane. It's supposed to stick anything to anything.
DonkeyHody
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You can either improve the hole or glue the screw.
(1) find a dowel or match stick that just barely fits in the hole. Dip in a epoxy glue and insert it in the hole and let it dry. Using a "good" screw, reinstall hinge.
(2) Dip screw in expoxy and reinstall hinge. (Just a dab will it)
(3) Replace the hinges with a different model and different screw locations.
I have "never" seen a hinge with "one" screw.
RayV wrote:

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Wed, Dec 20, 2006, 8:24am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (RayV) doth mumble: <snip> Each hinge is only screwed to the frame with one screw. <snip> I was thinking a little silicone in the screw hole would hold them and still be removeable.
Looks like three screw holes to me. I think four would be better.
You ask about silicone, but the subject says loctite. That's an interesting thought. Personally, I think loctite might well hold, but could give problems when removing screws. So I nominate you try loctite, and get back to us on it. All in favor say aye. All opposed say nay. OK, the ayes have it.
JOAT Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength. - Eric Hoffer
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J T wrote:

OK, since the motion has carried for me to try loctite what color should I use?
How much should I apply to each screw?
What setting on my torque rench should I use?
Damn, these are European hinges and my wrench only reads in ft/lbs. Anyone have a conversion chart for torque wrenches?
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On Thu, 21 Dec 2006 05:50:59 -0800, RayV wrote:

You haven't discovered the google calculator? Go to google and try this search: "14.3 foot pounds in newton meters". Don't include the quotation marks. I've found very few units that it won't convert.
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--John
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Huh, I'm impressed. Whoda thunk they covered this one?
14.3 (inches per second) = 1.14621067 10**20 angstroms per millenium
http://www.google.com/search?&q .3+inches+per+second+in+angstroms+per+millenium
Maybe density, in AMUs per cubic parsec?
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde (in WmCih.3330$Iy5.1541@trnddc01) said:
| | || You haven't discovered the google calculator? Go to google and || try this search: "14.3 foot pounds in newton meters". Don't || include the quotation marks. I've found very few units that it || won't convert. | | Huh, I'm impressed. Whoda thunk they covered this one? | | 14.3 (inches per second) = 1.14621067 W 10**20 angstroms per | millenium | | http://www.google.com/search?&q .3+inches+per+second+in+angstroms+pe r+millenium | | Maybe density, in AMUs per cubic parsec?
Or if you'd like to solve physics problems in user-friendly units, you can ask for "c in furlongs per fortnight" (the speed of light 1.8026175 1012 furlongs per fortnight.)
Watch out for rounding errors <eg>
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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On Thu, 21 Dec 2006 20:44:38 +0000, Mark Jerde wrote:

http://www.google.com/search?&q .3+inches+per+second+in+angstroms+per+millenium
Managed that one fine. The only thing I've tried that it won't handle is inches of mercury as a unit of pressure.

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--John
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The calculator that comes with Mac OSX can convert to in-Hg.
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On Thu, 21 Dec 2006 16:52:57 -0500, Roy Smith wrote:

Then maybe you ought to get on google feedback and tell them to start running Macs.
--
--John
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RayV wrote:

Go for the green- sleeve retainer. Keep it moving. Improvise the rest.
J
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On Thu, 21 Dec 2006 08:37:51 -0500, J T wrote:

There are different grades of Loctite with different degrees of holding strength, from "easily adjustable" to "heat it red hot and _maybe_ it'll come out if you're having a good day".
When using Loctite with wood, go to the Loctite site and read the technical information--it may need a primer in order to cure, the same way that CA needs an accelerator.

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--John
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RayV wrote:

Before I read the end of your post, clear silicone was what came to my mind too.
The real problem here is the single screw holding the frame. This allows for some rotation, which eventually loosens the screw. How about replacing the hinges with a better design using at least two screws on each hinge flange? Of course that could take a lot of time to do.
If you do go the glue route (which is probably what I would do), ask yourself if you might ever want to undo the screw for any reason some day. Epoxies and polyurethane/Gorilla glue would make that job difficult or impossible; silicone would be a better choice IMO.
Mark
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If you do go the glue route (which is probably what I would do), ask yourself if you might ever want to undo the screw for any reason some day. Epoxies and polyurethane/Gorilla glue would make that job difficult or impossible; silicone would be a better choice IMO.
Mark
Maybe, however I have been using polyurethane to re-bed the SS screws on the spray hood of my sailboat. I remove the spray hood every 2 to 3 years and I do not have any problem to remove the screws. I also used Gorilla glue to re-bed screws in wood, presswood and plywood with no problem. As long as the Robertson, Phillip or slotted head is clean and the screw driver has a firm and positive contact with the screw's head it works fine. Over the years I have learned that it was better to use a old awl to clean the screw head first The worst are the Phillip head. A worn out Phillip screw driver is the worst thing to use especially with a powered driver. Using Locktite on metal to metal is a different kettle of fish.

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redbelly98 wrote:

snipped-for-privacy@nb.sympatico.ca wrote:

Thanks for the info, that is good to know. Surprising to me, but now I can keep that in mind in the future.

Depends on which Loctite product you mean. Besides their superglue, they do make threadlocker for machine screws where you can still remove the screw later if you want.
Mark
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