Locking drawer bits

Anybody ever use one of these? Do you think that it is suitable for drawer contruction in kitchen cabinets - will the joints hold up in the long run? I'm sure dovetails can't be beat for strength and looks, but even with a good jig, they seem much more time consuming that this setup.
http://www.routerbits.com/cgi-routerbits/sr.cgi?1077114912_29719+71
Thought, opinions, random musing all welcome.
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I just made a set of kitchen drawers using a similar bit and 1/2" baltic birch. It takes about 15 minutes and a few test cuts to set up, especially if you've never done it before, but once done you can proceed fairly fast (at about a minute or two per drawer). I'd think the drawers are plenty strong for kitchen use. There's a lot of glue surface making for a robust joint.
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This is a personal opinion. It seems to me nobody who is in the cabinet business for kitchens uses dovetails. Things like locking drawer joints and pocket hole joinery are what a commercial cabinet maker needs to keep their costs down and have reasonable quality work. Dovetails are for fine furniture and hobbyists who don't need to make money with woodworking.
Bob

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I do. No I don't do kitchens exclusively, but when I do a set of cabs for a kitchen every drawer is dovetailed. If your jig is set up right it really doesn't take any longer to half blind a drawer than it does to make most any other joint. I guess its like you said, its a personal opinion.
Jim

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My opinion, with lots of glue area and the interlocking design any great strength difference between a drawer lock joint and dovetails isn't worth mentioning.
--
Mike G.
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As long as you want random musings... I just bought a drawer lock and used it for one drawer. It was a somewhat different shape than the one you show. I had a cherry front and poplar sides. http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bt_doo r.html#drawer_lock_bits_anchor PN 7851 It took a while to set up, but the results were great; until I flexed it a tad to put the back on and part of the poplar broke off where it set into the cherry. I don't know if it was a problem with the poplar not being strong enough, or if the design is flawed. (any comments anyone?) But the glue joint held.
As long as I have the bit I will certainly try it again, but I don't think I could recommend buying the bit.
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Toller, what thickness was the poplar? The link you listed indicates the bit #7851 is for 3/4" stock and #7852 is for 1/2" stock.
Bob

http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bt_doo
the
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One small suggestion. When you get the bit set up so that your ready to cut the drawer parts, cut a piece of scrap and save it so that you have a gauge for the next time. It makes setup a whole lot eaiser.
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Now you tell me...I didn't do this, but I've wished a couple of times I had. The bit takes a little fiddling to get it right, but works great once you get it set up. I made 8 large drawers for a dresser using it about a year ago and even though some of the drawers are used daily the joint has held up great. Once you get it set up do save a scrap piece that you can use as a gauge for the next time.
-- Larry C in Auburn WA

to cut the

gauge for the

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Wyatt Wright wrote:

FYI, you don't need a special bit to do a locking-rabbet drawer joint. It can be done with only a 1/4" straight bit. For that matter, you can do it all on the TS with a 1/4" dado blade.
C
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I'm not exactly sure what you mean by a locking-rabbet drawer joint. Could you describe it to me so I can learn something?
Bob
1. more non-end grain glue surface area

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"Bob Davis" wrote in message

Could
http://www.shopsmithhandson.com/archives/nov_dec_02/html/majorproject/mpplans4.pdf
Can also be cut on a table saw with a regular blade.
--
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It looks just like the joint produced by the drawer lock bit. It looks like it would take 3 setups and 3 cuts to make on a tablesaw. Am I missing something? I can see where a drawer lock bit would be much, much faster and accurate. I watched the guy a the woodworking show using a drawer lock bit. There's no way I could compete with him using a table saw.
Bob

http://www.shopsmithhandson.com/archives/nov_dec_02/html/majorproject/mpplans4.pdf
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You're not missing anything. You wanted to know what the joint looked like, I showed you. How you want to effect the joint is up to you, your wallet, and the equipment you have on hand.
Note carefully that all I remarked was that it _could_ "also" be cut on the table saw.
IME, it is wise to not lock yourself into one way, or one tool, to do things, no pun intended ... relying on specialty router bits when all the stores are closed, or out of stock, can cost you in a pinch.
FWIW, when I first learned the joint some 40 years ago, it was called a "half blind lap joint" ... those who say it is as strong as a dovetail are fooling themselves, IMO.
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Thank you for the complete reply, Swingman. I didn't mean to challenge you. I just didn't understand. I agree - a dovetail is about as strong as it gets for this application.
Bob

like,
the
http://www.shopsmithhandson.com/archives/nov_dec_02/html/majorproject/mpplans4.pdf
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No, you don't, but the advantage of the drawer lock bit is that once you have it set up you can cut both sides and fronts/backs with the same setup, and the joints are very tight and precise. With the straight bit or tablesaw, you'll need to change the setup between sides and front/backs.
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I use this one:
http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber330
Does a fine job. Yes, takes a little fussing to set up, but makes a nice joint. This one can also be used like a tongue & groove edge joint.
--
Nahmie
Those who know the least will always know it the loudest.
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