Live Oak Wood

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Popt50 wrote:

Generally it's easier to make projects out of it if the oak is dead first. :)
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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On 13 Dec 2003 18:31:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Popt50) wrote:

I have a couple of planes made of liveoak. It seems to be excellent for that. They are hard and dense, compared to the usual beech.
Both were user made, not from a factory.
Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a
"In this house we _obey_ the laws of thermodynamics." --Homer Simpson
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for that. They are hard and dense, compared to the usual beech.

+ + + Live oak (Quercus ilex) is one of the traditional woods for the handles of mortise chisels (factory-made, in the days when factory-made did not preclude small scale production). Also in the running works of windmills.
It will be some 50% stronger than beech. PvR
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oak
want to

I've never worked live oak, but I will point out it was an important resource for ship construction back in the days of sail. I believe you will find a lot of it in the Old Iron Sides.
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Fascinating thread! Out here on the west coast, we have three dominant species of live oak; the Coast Live Oak (quercus agrifola), the Interior Live Oak (q. wislizenii) and the Engelmann Oak (q. engelmanii). As you might expect in SoCal, they frequently interbreed, so crosses and hybrids are quite common. Conventional wisdom says the wood is not workable-- too hard and moves too much, with short trunks which do not yeild boards of any notable length. However, I have had a great deal of success with it for smaller pieces and accents. One piece I found has an intense fiddleback figure, and when quarter-sawn, a truly spectacular flecking. I'm saving this for something special. Another piece of downed wood had sat in the mulch so long that the tannin had reacted with the wood and turned the bottom few inches into what is essentially bog oak. Now, that's flashy! I personally am a fan of this neglected wood, although I wouldn't try to use it for casework. And if all else fails, it makes great, and I mean great barbecue!
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