Lipped drawer fronts

I am ready to make some drawers for the lower half of a hutch. I am interested in what I have seen called "lipped" drawer fronts or rabbeted drawer fronts as my Leigh DT jig manual calls them. It's unclear to me, though, whether there is an edge treatment (like a roundover edge) on all 4 sides of the drawer front, or just the 2 sides and the top, with no edge treatment on the bottom.
If there is an edge treatment on all 4 sides, then it would appear that the bottom of the drawer front does not have a rabbet? So that the 2 sides and top overlap the drawer opening (acting as a stop also), and the bottom one would be directly in line with it? Wouldn't this look kind of weird? I can't picture it very well. Any pointers to images or other references welcomed..
Cheers
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am ready to make some drawers for the lower half of a hutch. I am interested in what I have seen called "lipped" drawer fronts or rabbeted drawer fronts as my Leigh DT jig manual calls them. It's unclear to me, though, whether there is an edge treatment (like a roundover edge) on all 4 sides of the drawer front, or just the 2 sides and the top, with no edge treatment on the bottom.
If there is an edge treatment on all 4 sides, then it would appear that the bottom of the drawer front does not have a rabbet? So that the 2 sides and top overlap the drawer opening (acting as a stop also), and the bottom one would be directly in line with it? Wouldn't this look kind of weird? I can't picture it very well. Any pointers to images or other references welcomed..
Cheers
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry for the double post.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can have a rabbet all the way around. On my Akeda jig the side stops are built in a way to allow the inside of the rabbet to index on them so you don't have to do anything special. On the Leigh you may have to make a block of wood equal to the width of the rabbet to offset the sides, I'm not sure.
That being said, I prefer to use a false front instead. Make the dovetails through dovetails and just add a front after.
-Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For best appearances the rabbet should be all the way around the drawer front, bottom included. This will hide, as intended, all gaps around the drawer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok, that is what I thought. I came across an article by Lonnie Byrd (?) that said having it on 3 sides, and flat on the bottom was the more traditional way, since the bottom lip was prone to being broken off when the drawer was removed and set somewhere. I don't anticipate the drawer being removed frequently however..
Cheers!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Traditional huh? Strange. Seems you would not add a design element that would look asymmetrical so that you could add a layer of protection when the drawer was not in its normal location. I wonder what technique would be advised to keep you from stepping on the drawer and crushing it.
Basically you would end up with a drawer that looks "different" 99.999% of the time to protect it against a situation that it may be exposed to .001% of the time.
I could be wrong.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
" snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com" wrote:

Last project I built had rabbit around top and sides with flat bottom for drawer fronts.
Looks just fine for my purposes since bottom of drawer is almost hidden from view.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'll second that.. Many shaker drawer fronts were made that way..
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 Apr 2009 07:17:31 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I prefer a roundover, or whatever, on just the sides. The tops and bottoms overlap such that they touch their neighbor, with allowance for expansion. Looks really nice if you can match the grain.
I've got a tool stand in the workshop that has 10 graduated drawers in pairs. On it I only did a roundover on the outside edges so the the front looks solid. I found wood wide enough that I could make the 4 largest drawer fronts from a single piece. Likewise the 6 smaller ones. Came out pretty nice. Of course, I'm not unbiased on the subject :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.