Lint Free Cloth


What do you use for a lint free cloth when finishing your projects?
Thanks,
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 16:31:17 +0000, Michael opined:

SWMBO got me a yard of unbleached muslin at the fabric store.
Worn out athletic socks work for buffing wax, but not for applying shellac. Same for worn out flannel sheets.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
wreck20051219 at spambob.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 16:31:17 GMT, "Michael"

Well-washed cotton. Worn-out either top-quality office shirts ("formal", but I don't mean tuxedo stuff), or boxer shorts. Both of these are made from a long-staple Egyptian or Sea Island cotton. If you're french polishing with pumice, then you notice the difference - lesser fabrics, even lesser cottons, wear through in no time.
My denim workshop shirts also go a similar route and are used for general rags and oil application. T shirts are little use for anything.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Water, T shirt, Kiwi paste shoe wax, and patience. Best combination ever for spit shining shoes.
Of course, spit shining shoes is the reason I wear rough out leather now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

for
Charlie, A lot of 'these guys' don't have a clue about the pleasures of whiling away a Saturday night inhaling that fine scent {we used a dash of rubbing alcohol}. Then there's the *Ultimate* finish . . . water buffing.
I even knew a guy who spit shined the bill of his fatigue cap {Our school CO had a 'thing' for Ridgeway's}
Of course, *nobody* believes us . . . unless it's another 'geezer'.
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop {I'm USAF myself, but I know a retired Sergeant Major who still looks like a Recruiting Poster - Sember Fi !! }
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michael wrote:

Every year or two I buy a box of Scott "Rags in a Box". Lint free and disposable. My used socks and skivvies go to the mission.     satisfied costumer,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do these look like a roll of regular paper towels? Wal Mart had them in the clearance bin, and I grabbed a roll for 2 bucks or so.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michael wrote:

Actually they look more like Kleenex. In a box about a foot cubed with a hole on one side. Pull on the one sticking out until the tear-off shows.     mahalo,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I spoke with a Minwax rep at a woodworking show once and asked him that same question. He suggested old cotton t-shirts, but if you rip them in half to put them in the washer to get rid of the newly created lint. Also suggested the Scott Rags you find at Home Depot (looks like rolls of paper towel). Use the white rolls, not the blue. I haven't tried the Scott Rags yet so test on scrap first! Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The white rolls of Scott rags work well. I can usually find them a bit cheaper at Menards than at HD. The boxed Scott rags are similar, but I find it easier to keep the rolls on a paper towel holder and just tear off what I need. SWMBO likes them better than normal paper towels for use in her kitchen, but I try to discourage that due to their cost!
TT
On Sun, 12 Feb 2006 13:00:47 GMT, "P.I._Maine"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A cloth with no lint :)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Use those little sheets that are put in the dryer to eliminate wrinkles. After that use, don't throw them in the trash. They are lint and chemical free, and a good size for such uses.
Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.