lining up drawer supports in cabinet carcass

Hi,
I am building a changing table for the child my wife and I are expecting. I've decided to build it with three large drawers on one side, and a door and drawer on the other, taller side.
I've built the face frame, and I've cut all the pieces for the carcass. I've also built lap jointed rectangluar drawer supports that the drawers will rest on.
So the question is, how do I line up the drawer suppoorts from front to back, so that they are level, and square? Is there some trick to it? How do I ensure that the cleats that attach to the carcass to hold the supports are in the correct position?
Any help would be appreciated.
- Thanks,
Todd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15 Dec 2003, Todd Seidenberg spake unto rec.woodworking:

    Put the carcase sides together, side by side, on your bench, with the back edges together. Measure down from the top on each outside edge, to the cleat position, and clamp a straightedge across the marks. You can then glue, or screw, or glue and screw, or fasten the cleats in whatever fashion you desire, and both sides will match.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Todd Seidenberg wrote:

Often there are jigs available to assist in the installation of the slides. Here's one example"
http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/findprod.cfm?skuU53
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Among the other good ideas, consider cutting some appropriately sized 'spacers' out of scrap, one or more for each side.
Batch cut them so they are precisely the same size for each application/opening, and start from a common point.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 9/21/03
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are a multitude of ways to approach this. Since you're using a face frame, I would cut dadoes into the sides on the table saw. Cut adjacent grooves at the same time on corresponding parts, and they will be perfectly aligned (make sure you run the same edge against the fence each time). When you put on the face frame, the dado won't show through. Fit the drawer supports to these dadoes, and you'll have a very secure joint for the drawers to be supported by.
Mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The approach I use is to follow this sequence in the construction of a cabinet of any kind that contains a drawer: 1. Build the carcass. 2. Build and attach the face frame: 3. Build or buy the drawer slides/supports 4. Build the drawer(s) to fit the openings in the face frame. The size of the drawer must be reduced to include space for the slides if they are side mounted. 5. Temporarily attach the slides into position (clamps usually will work) then insert the drawer and adjust the position of the slides so that drawer is centered in opening and the drawer front touches the face frame on all four sides when closed. Slide the drawer in and out to be sure you have smooth sliding action without excessive looseness. When satisfied with fit permanently anchor the slides/drawer supports. Earl Creel

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.