Lining clamp pads - what to use?

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1x2 edging won't require great force. Attach two wooden blocks to the 2x with screws and glue, the blocks set a bit wider than the required clamping distance, and use wedges to apply the clamping force.
R
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Greg Guarino wrote:

There are lots of ways to improvise clamps. I used to do what you are doing without *any* pipe clamps. I used the fence of my radial saw one one side; for the other, I clamped a 2x4 to the table and used wedges with it. No reason you can't clamp or nail a couple of 2x4s to a piece of plywood and use wedges on both sides.
--

dadiOH
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I have an assortment of ply and solid wood scrap for buffering clamp jaws. For non-stick surfaces, I have some scrap laminent flooring pieces.
Often times, I have furniture that needs repair/reclamping (during the upholstery process). The surfaces are finished, so I have a dozen or so blocks wrapped with scrap upholstery fabric (stapled on the backside), that prevents marring the furniture finish.
Sonny
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On 10/4/2011 2:39 PM, dadiOH wrote:

That idea appeals to my practical side (which is all sides really), but wouldn't wedges apply pressure unevenly, perhaps putting the pieces out of square? I must not be visualizing it right. Maybe you use two wedges facing in opposite directions, laying down on their sides?
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Yep. Or attach the block to match the wedge angle.
R
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Greg Guarino wrote:

Yes.
Wedges are always used in pairs.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

...unless you wish to clamp something which is not exactly square to the faces of the clamp.
-- Worry is a misuse of imagination. -- Dan Zadra
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On 10/5/2011 7:10 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Makes sense. If you wouldn't mind furthering my education (again) should I decide to make myself some wedges, what angle do you recommend?
This could become useful pretty soon, as the desktop I'm making is 6 feet long. I have actually unearthed one very old bar clamp of sufficient length (among the debris of an old plumber/kitchen installer), but one clamp won't do the job. I could buy some longer pieces of pipe, but this idea intrigues me.
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wrote:

I think 7-10 degrees is the norm. Steep enough to work but shallow enough not to self-release.

Also look into cam clamps. http://goo.gl/zzPqt them store-boughten wuns http://woodworkstuff.net/HoweClamp.html diy
-- We are always the same age inside. -- Gertrude Stein
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Greg Guarino wrote:

Never measured so I just did...they are about 18 degrees.
The less the angle the greater the mechanical advantage but you also have to move them more to "spread" them a given distance.
Mine are fine for me. One tip, don't smooth the mating edges...if they are rough there is much less tendency for them to slip (which has never been a problem for me).
Larry Jaques mentioned cam clamps. They are handy too. In case you don't know what they are, they are cut out of a piece of plywood (usually) and look like a giant comma. The head of the comma is fastened down via an off center hole; when you rotate the tail of the comma, the distance of the head - being off center - to whatever you are clamping varies.
--

dadiOH
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Search visually. An odd thing - you said bar clamps, but the term bar clamp pads turns up store-bought solutions, and pipe clamp pads turns up better solutions for you. http://tinyurl.com/clamp-pads
R
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Yikes. Varied assoetments of pads run $3.99 - $4.99. But these:
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Adjustable-Clamp-Bar-Clamp-Pads-8-Pack-7437/14294044
must be REALLY REALLY good ones.
-Zz
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On Tue, 04 Oct 2011 07:42:27 -0700, Zz Yzx wrote:

Pack-7437/14294044
$19.99???????? The same pads are $3.71 on Amazon. Seems like Walmart isn't *always* cheaper :-).
--
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To keep your cork or other facing material in place, use double sided tape behind it. It will hold until the clamp is lined up. I use carpet tape to do this, it is better than double sided scotch tape. If you take it off the clamp as soon as you are done, very little adhesive stays behind to clean up.
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