Life expectancy of planer blades???

I'm sure the life of planer blades varies with the type of wood, blade speed, number of blades, etc...
That said how many bf of red oak & cedar should I expect to be able to plane before needing to replace/flip blades
Are we talking 100's of bf or over 1000?
ThankX, Ron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ron,
My guess is that, like all blades, bits etc., they will fail right is the middle of a project...about 8:45pm...on a Saturday night...and ALL the area hardware stores are closed on Sunday.
As the proud owner of a new DW735, I'm hoping the blades are good for a few 1,000 bdft. Good question though. I'll find out down the road a ways.
DexAZ

plane
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've got the Delta 13 inch planer and had put about 3 - 400 bd feet of oak and walnut through it then decided to clean the finish off a nice piece of mahogany that was given to me. About 10 feet of mahogany with finish on it took the edge right off the blades. These blades are double sided so I turned them over and went out and bought another 2 sets to hang on the wall.
I've got another bunch of boards with finish on them so when I decide to use them the dull blades go back in just long enough to clean off the finish.
Rick
--
webservant

Web design for churches http://www.gibs-web.ca
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

use
I can't remember where I saw this... (Woodworking magazine, I'm sure.) They said that running a benchtop planer with dull knives will significantly shorten its life. The higher force needed to push dull blades through wood stresses the drive train and increases the amp draw of the motor. Maybe they're all wet, but it made sense to me and convinced me to flip the knives on my 12.5" Delta. (I'm a cheap bastard and had already put /way/ too much wood through those blades.)
Bruce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

plane
Depends on how many nails you find.
To extend the life of the blades, try to use as much of the blade as you can. If you are planing 4" board, don't just keep feeding the center. Once you flip the blades, buy a backup set to keep on hand. When my blades went, they went FAST and almost cost me a lot of wood. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ron, I agree with Ed... you've got to feed your lumber in all along the planer's width so one part of the blade doesn;t wear fater than another. But... you probably knew that already.
I work almost exclusively with qs white oak. I dont think I've ever paid attention to how many bf I'm getting out of my planer blades, but I'll guess between 75 and 100 board feet, depending on my depth of cut. Taking light passes is certainly easier on the blades, but it takes more passes to get where you want to be. I'm a big believer in light cuts though, and I don;t mind feeding the machine more often.
That 75-100 board feet guestimate is with roughsawn lumber and planing it only enough to bring it to a smooth finished surface. I say guestimate because it could be half that much or twice as much.
Larry -- Americans snipped-for-privacy@totacc.com

plane
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

guess
Wow. That seems really short. inless you are referrring to the actual VOLUME of material removed. I'm referring to 100 bf being processing 100bf of rough-cut stock , 4/4 or 5/4 into nominal S4S.
My cumulative guess over a halfdozen blade changes on a delta snipe-master and a DW733 is a few hundred bd ft.
That's doing some dimensoning on the stock too, not just getting to a smooth surface.
I too learned the hard way that you can NOT remove finish with a planer. It kills the blades almost immediately.
-Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Meaningless answers to an unanswerable question. They last until they're too dull to plane the kind of wood you have to plane at the moment. Might do the next variety well, but that's a horse of a different color.

it
VOLUME
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You bring up a good point though. If you have blades that are getting dull, but can still cut, replace them now. Save the old set for the first pass or two of some wood that may be questionable so as not to ruin the good set of knives. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think the OP was looking for a rough guestimate with which to set his expectations. I believe that IS and answerable question.
If you would post your experience, it would be another data point and more useful than what you chose to post.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a 12.5" Delta that is still on the original set. I figure I have surfaced aprox. 200 bf of rough white oak, and maybe another 100 bf of various soft woods. The rough oak required about 1/4" of wood removal for the 200 feet in small increments so I guess you could say I have planed away 50 feet of white oak......
The blades are still sharp but showing signs of needing replacement (more tear out)
-Bruce
Stephen M wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That IS my experience.
Lemme say it slowly - " i t d e p e n d s."
Oh yes, have a spare set on hand and it won't matter.

they're
Might
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Care to quantify that?
Under what conditions did you get xxx knife life?
The OP only asked to narrow it down to an order of magnitude: hundreds or thousands.
(e.g. to paraphrase another poster: 10's if you remove try to remove finish)
I'm sure you can be helpful if you really try.
-s
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In magnitudes of ten.
One pass if board contains nails. Ten passes if the board is painted. One hundred passes if the board has a lot of dust/dirt. One thousand passes if it's nice clean, straight soft stock. Ten thousand passes if your ears can stand it, the motor doesn't burn out and you're not particular about what the surface looks like.
One spare pair of blades, once installed will make the next pass as perfect as you can get..
Have somebody read/explain this to you. If you understand this, we'll talk about how you can get three times the passes with boards 1/3 as wide as the blades, and other complicated stuff.

finish)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The original set that came with my AP-10 WHICH are NOT disposable are still working just fine.16 years later.

plane
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Teak will wear them down faster than cherry. Dirty gritty boards will also put mileage on blades. A lot depends on how you use your planer. I'd expect at least 1000 sq feet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

================================I am really surprised at the low figures everyone is posting... I really am... I purchased 1000 bt of rough cut Walnut a few years ago plus at least 300 bf of poplar and an equal amount of cherry... and I am almost completely out of that stock... The Blades were not new in my Dewalt 730-something and I am still getting very acceptable results...
My guess would be at least a 1000 more like 2000 Bf.... maybe I am blessed with a set of super blades
Bob Griffiths
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.