Lie-Nielsen or Veritas

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It's time I buy a good plane. I need it for fitting doors to openings, drawers to openings, and the like. I don't need one for surfacing large areas. What size would you suggest? I'm leaning towards a No. 4. Which brand do you prefer: L/N or Veritas? I'm not concerned about the price.
Thanks, Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The Veritas planes are very good -- square and flat right out of the box, quite sharp with only light honing needed, sturdy and well balanced. Excellent planes, and a good value.
But if you're not concerned about the price, buy the L-N.
Or buy the Veritas, and send the difference to me.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Low angle block plane (with adjustable mouth) is perfect for small trimming tasks like that, and the low angle works well on end grain.

I don't think you could go wrong with either one. I have the LN, which performs beautifully and is arguably "prettier" with the bronze cap. However, I have the Veritas Shoulder plane and one of their replacement blades, which are also top-notch quality, and everything I've heard about the LV LABP is positive. The only real differences I've come up with from checking specs, reading here etc. are that: 1.) the LN doesn't have a lateral adjust lever (I haven't missed one; it's easy enough to just move the blade by hand), 2.) the LN doesn't have accessories like a choice of blade materials (A1 or O2) or an add-on ball tail and knob http://tinyurl.com/ydzwea and 3.) they're slightly different sizes and shapes, which I think is entirely a matter of personal preference. I'd see if you could try out each one in your hand, and see which one rubs you the right way. Good luck, and I think you'll be happy either way you decide on this, Andy
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4) LN's are made in America, one of the few things that is.
Andy wrote:

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Never Enough Money wrote:

Veritas planes are made in Canada, by what I assume are fairly treated Canadians working in good conditions. Not USA made, but not a cheap-labor import, either.
If money were no object, I'd buy the LN for the glitz (_real_ and perceived). However, money is always an object at some level, so most of my own hand planes are Veritas. My bottom line is that either brand makes me a happy 'dorker, as I've gotten to use many brands during various classes.
If I were going for a low-angle block, I'd probably buy the Veritas.
If I were looking for ONE, really awesome, highly useful plane, I'd consider this: <http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdIDD31
This plane is slightly wider than many block planes, and the open sides allow extra duty adjusting rabbets and tenons. However, you'd give up the adjustable mouth of the LABP, which is also a valuable feature.
Decisions... <G>
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Well, yeah, but if I were looking for ONE, really awesome, highly useful TOOL, I'd consider this:
http://www.mcfeelys.com/product.asp?pid=KLT-9800&id 91326
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Yeah, but for that price, where's the corkscrew?
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Roy Smith wrote:

As a cyclist, I prefer the Park BO-1:
<http://www.parktool.com/parktoolgear/detail.asp?catd&item=BO-1
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It's a dandy. I use it for general block work and for rabbeting and fitting tenon cheeks. The geometry is a bit clumsy for shouldering, but with a bit of effort it's possible. Got the Veritas shoulder to do that now, and no complaint or difficulty.
For me the smoother from Veritas is a real joy, because I have large hands. The frog/mouth adjustment is positive, easy, and makes a smooth translucent shaving. Amazes the kids when they see me reach for the plane rather than the sander, but then they see and feel the surface, and understand.
The LN low-angle smoother http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?sku 4 will handle the gnarliest wood without a problem, but I'd go conventional angle for general work.
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PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdI
I bought the LN Standard Angle Block (9 1/2), and have loved it a lot. It's the right weight, fits my hand and my work, and feels great. My dad calls it 'my high tech plane'. I bought him a LV Low Angle Block plane, which he opts to keep in my shop. (He's in his 80's now.) It gets some use, but not nearly as much.
One of the LN Rabbet block planes follwed me home from a wood show last spring, but it sits still in its packaging, in the bottom of my tool shrine. I haven't had the need to open it up, and use it yet.
For the OP: I don't think, from your description of what you've said you want to do, that you need consider a much larger plane than a Stanley #3. The Veritas Low Angle Smoother, a LN #3, a LN 9 1/2, a Veritas Low Angle Block. Pick two, and get some decent sharpening gear, if you haven't yet. And maybe the Veritas Apron plane, too.
It's only money. ;-)
Patriarch
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B A R R Y wrote:

Good conditions? In Canada????
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I don't think most people count cold and snow as unfair working conditions... <G>
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We do have a few buildings up here. Some of them even have furnaces!
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On 15/12/2006 5:08 PM, Dave Balderstone wrote:

You've got a furnace??? I tried that, just keeps melting the roof.
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You're telling that to a guy who goes to Lake Placid and Fairbanks, AK for winter vacation. <G>
This year, I'm headed to Iceland in February.
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B A R R Y wrote:

Iceland in february is much warmer than either Lake Placid or Fairbanks.
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On 16 Dec 2006 16:22:04 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@binet.is wrote:

Hence this year's trip! I'm understanding that it'll be similar to New York City, climate-wise. A daily high of 35-40F?
If I really wanted COLD this year, I'd go to Greenland. <G>
Care to share any non-touristy restaurant suggestions around Reykjavik?
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B A R R Y wrote:

Well, the variations can be considerable, you can have still weather, snow cover and -10C and you can have up to 15C with lashing rain and high winds and both can be considered quite normal.

I do not have any suggestions at the moment but you can take a look at the Grapevine for some suggestions (www.grapevine.is)
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On 17 Dec 2006 11:37:21 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@binet.is wrote:

Thanks!
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On 16 Dec 2006 16:22:04 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@binet.is wrote:

IIRC, Iceland was so named in order to discourage people from wanting to go there, it really isn't "icy". OTOH, Greenland was so named for the opposite reason, to make a big hunk of ice sound that much more appealing.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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