Li-ion Batteries

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On 9/2/2014 9:24 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Perhaps not that bad but you do not have to register 99% of most any products to get warranty work, you only need proof of purchase. Mostly registration helps to speed the process should work need to be done later on.

Exactly and for a few of us that is the case. But if a contractor walks in to buy a replacement drill than he needs NOW and where time is money, the extra steps and time of getting a replacement part is simply ignored. When you need a part NOW waiting for an exchange is not going to factor in.

From what I understand you have to send the parts/tool to a repair facility and wait for the return shipment. If time is on your side, no problem.
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On 9/2/2014 11:46 AM, Leon wrote:

And just another observation, HD probably would not be selling replacement batteries for Ridgid tools if the process of free warranty replacement was quick and easy.
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On 9/2/14, 10:46 AM, Leon wrote:

Yep. A friend went through the process after the cells died in a few months after purchase. He had to find a repair shop in our semi-remote area (90 mile round trip) and drop off the batteries. After a 3 week wait he went to pick them up. The 'warranty' is legit, but a pain to execute.
-BR
--- ---
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At least some packs use the same technology as is found in laptop battery packs. Each cell is tested individually during the charging process and the packs internal chip decides if it will be getting a voltage during the next charging pulse. They equalize the weak cells and bring them up to full strength while cutting power to cells that are full, or to cells that are too hot during the charging process.
I have a hobby charger that charges RC packs much the same way. It has to have the correct hookups to use the full equalizing process. Many say that if the user does not push the cells to absolute deadness, and discharges the whole pack right after a charge once in a while that balancing is not needed. I'm not convinced on that one.
--
Jim in NC


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On 9/2/2014 11:19 AM, Morgans wrote:

No doubt however one does not know what is going on in every case with each manufacturer. The circuitry may or may not take care of voltage differences.

I have heard it is best to not run past 80% discharge and I suspect that is why most Li-Ion batteries have gas gauges these days. I have heard that some packs will not allow discharge beyond a certain point.
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On Tue, 2 Sep 2014 20:01:32 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@rahul.net (Edward A. Falk) wrote:

Two things, the cells the rebuilders use are better than those in the OEM tools and they will rebuild batteries that I can no longer buy. FFOr some tools, the tools with the charger and batteries can be cheaper, on sale, than the replacement batteries alone.
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I used the Kobalt battery packs to rebuild my old NiCad packs, and they appear to cycle through the batteries as they charge.
The same lights that are the fuel gauge blink one at a time, progressively as a normal charge takes place. I think I also read that the charger equalizes the batteries, also. They will not charge they are too hot, I know. They will not charge if you fry the onboard chip circuitry. Unfortunately, I know that to be true after a blob of hot solder dropped onto the chip. The battery does stoop putting out juice when the demands on it are too high. If the voltage is getting low, it will put out fairly high amps. After the voltage gets lower, it will not put out hardly any amps before it turns off.
I tend to charge often. If I have been using a fair amount of battery power, I put it on charge when I quit for the night. If you believe what you read, it does not hurt the battery in life or output to charge often, so that works for me.
--
Jim in NC


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wrote:

Make that MOST - like almost all.
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*snip*

How old are your batteries? I've been getting 3-5 years out of my Li-Ion batteries before I notice a big drop off in charging capacity. I usually wait until the tool is slowing down or starts impacting early, so it'd be interesting to see if your method is any different.
Admittedly, I probably did kill the 18V screwdriver batteries by using them in the circular saw. But I've got Lithium Ion laptop batteries that are all dieing in that same time frame.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote

I am just now changing over, so I am not deep enough into the age curve to have any data.

Yes, it is true that the lower amp hour batteries like are to be found in screwdrivers and other entry level tools do not much like an extremely high drain user like a circular saw. I am not getting any low capacity batteries, to extend run times in drills and drivers, and to always have a high capacity cell ready for saws and such. I am using the Kobalt 4.0 amp hour battery as my rebuilding stock, so far. It has to be ordered online from Lowes in many areas, but is a deal for that capacity for around 89 bucks. Much better value than any other brand I am aware of.
I did do an experiment by ordering ultra high capacity cells the next size larger online. Extreme caution on this. The Chinese suppliers will stamp most any capacity on a cell to make the sale. Many test out at only 15% of the stamped capacity. Do research before buying cells by reading reviews of someone who has bought the cells and tested the capacity.
Anyway, I order 6 cells of 4.5 amp hour cells (1860 size?) and got them, and checked each cell's capacity on my hobby charger, and they did pretty well averaging around 4350 milliamp hours. Put them together and used them, and they lasted forever per charge. Then they started fading, so I took the pack apart to check it. One cell had gone to a near complete dead short. No problem, says I, I only used 5 of the 6 cells I ordered, so I can just switch out the bad one. Problem is that I put the extra cell somewhere safe and can't find it! I was using the hobby charger without the balancer, but when I find the missing cell, I will put it back together with a charging plug to accommodate the balancer.
By the way, do you all know that the larger capacity packs are simply a doubled up smaller pack. They are 10 cells for the 18 to 20 volt pack, hooked in two by five.
--
Jim in NC


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