Li-ion Batteries

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HI Group, I have three Ridgid li-ion batteries that I'm considering rebuilding. Has anyone done this? I've rebuilt Ni-cad battery packs without any difficulty but haven't dealt with Li-ion before. JIm
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James wrote:

My initial reaction is that doing that sounds potentially dangerous, but you must understand what you are doing!

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James wrote:

he had been to school to learn how to replace them but that the company forbade them to do it because of the potential danger.
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wrote:

If you can replace them with the same cells, it should be fine. Otherwise, as others point out, your charger may not be right. Some of these cells/batteries have internal protection chips so it matters which ones are used. I wouldn't do it.

Likely an overreaction but in this litigious society, it's understandable.
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Big thing is to use the on board charging chip, and connect them to your cells correctly. If you do not have the chip, your charger will likely not recognize the battery pack and refuse to charge it. It also will not keep the pack correctly balanced and charged and will not shut down the pack when it gets over heated, be it by charging, damage, discharging or hard use. Now that can cause a fire, no doubt.
I refitted Li Ion batteries into NiCad packs. I used the brand's chips and charger in the Li ion pack. I love it.
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On Mon, 1 Sep 2014 08:32:04 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

for his electric Miata - 144 volt pack, each cell about twice the size of a lb of butter. The protection circuits are "generic" - one per cell, and what they do is basically bypass the cell during charging if the cell temperature gets too high or (not sure) if the voltage gets out of spec. The charge controllers/protectors are not specific to the particular cells. There is a way to "turn on" the cell again if it shuts down due to over discharge(low voltage shutdown protection)
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Mike Marlow wrote:

I am registered for lifetime and had some replaced under that but they didn't say you had to tell them the serial numbers of the new batteries to keep it in effect.I contacted them and they weren't very helpful in getting it changed. Jim
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On 9/1/2014 10:35 AM, James wrote:

Good to know should I ever uy a Ridgid and go through that process.

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On 9/1/14, 1:13 PM, Leon wrote:

I'm pretty sure that info is clearly stated in their printed warranty and the original registration info.
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On 9/1/2014 1:17 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

parts had to be reregistered.
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wrote:

the original registered battery, and supplying the new batttery, they would record and re-register the serial of the replacement - but that would make too much sense for Home Despot (the owner of the ridgid brand, IIRC)
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On Mon, 01 Sep 2014 21:18:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Ridgid is owned by Emerson Electric. I don't know that they use the brand for anyone other than HD, though. They certainly sell to others. It's a rather large company.
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On Mon, 01 Sep 2014 21:58:54 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

America the rights to the name are held by Home Depot through a licencing agreement - since no-one else can sell the Ridgid brand of power tools in North America, they "effectively" "own" the brand.
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i think it is a unique business arrangement with HD. Some Ridgid tools are and or were available elsewhere, think shop vac, but a vast majority of the new Ridgid power tools are only available through HD.. Ryobi has a similar arangement with HD, years ago you could buy Ryobi most any where. Sears had that, a similar arrangement with the Craftsman brand name, now you can buy Craftsman at Ace Hardware.
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On Tuesday, September 2, 2014 8:26:24 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

I think the big difference is how the tools are designed and manufactured. I love to see how business changes and how they are run. It seems these d ays that most really large companies have little to do with some of their o wn products, other than to make sure the numbers "work". An outside engine ering firm brings a design for a new sander to a Big Box Store, and their t eam evaluates the service life, the usablility, the design, and the most im portant aspect, cost to manufacture. There is no doubt that some of the BB Ss have an interest in the companies they choose, but don't own them. They do however, own all other aspects of their product including the engineeri ng designs, distribution, etc.
Distributing a mass produced name friendly product across many channels jus t makes sense. For the most part, the higher the count of manufactured wid gets goes, the less price per widget results. So why not sell a mediocre br and like Sears anywhere you can? Same with Ridgid; they sell Ridgid tools (in a limited selection) at our largest plumbing supplier here, and now I s ee they have Ridgid recon items, brand new batteries and other Ridgid neces saries at CPO Outlets.
At once time, HD had a licensing deal with Ryobi. I think I read that Ryob i has since been purchased in whole or part by HD but don't know. So, 20+ years ago I wanted a new, powerful 14.4 drill. Ryobi was the only affordab le one out there, and I got a tip from a guy working there at HD that their other brands had been coming back as returns, but not the Ryobi. It was m arked "Ryobi Industrial" on the box. He assured me that the brand was big everywhere but here in the USA.
As much in their infancy as USABLE battery powered tools were in those days , that drill was a winner and lasted about 5 years on the job as my only co rdless drill. When I decided to retire it, it was because of the price of replacing two batteries (think 15 years ago). Now Ryobi is quite different and is now a name like so many others. Look halfway down the page and see if you recognize any of the brands owned by this investment group:
http://www.ttigroup.com/en/our_brands/
I think most tools these days are designed not with long term usability lik e Festool does, but more for a guy looking for utility value. Personally, I am somewhere in the middle. I love using a really nice tool, but find it hard to let go of the cash these days. And for the most part, unless you jump all the way up to a Festool type brand, I am not so sure we get much d ifference in our tools these days regardless of what we spend.
Robert
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On 09/02/2014 1:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

Slightly different w/ Craftsman. Sears (now called the Sears Holding Company) OWNS the Craftsman trademark (TM) and marketed it exclusively until got into so much trouble financially they decided to try to glom onto anything they could get out of it from licensing arrangements.
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On 09/02/2014 4:02 PM, dpb wrote:

Which is only a prelude to the comment I really intended to make...this proliferation of Craftsman probably has no real disadvantage in large markets but in small ones like here where the Sears store is just one of the affiliate catalog/small store ones, when the Ace Hardware is allowed to sell Craftsman, too, that seems to me to be patently unfair to the Sears franchise owners just on the other end of town a mile or two away...
While don't do much at Sears, (they're also the only GE appliance outlet in town just as an aside) it's another problem with keeping any variety at all in a small town; it would be an option gone if it can't/doesn't survive and this ploy by their parent can't be helping.
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It would appear that way but you can buy Rigid brand vacuums and accessories through a number of retailers and Amazon. While HD sells the vast majority of the Ridgid product line some of the line is available elsewhere.
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Business 101, make the discount or freeby more difficult so that the appearance of a good deal brings the customer in but does not get fulfilled for what ever reason. Coupons bring attention to a product and offer a discount but the amount of coupons that are actually used vs. distributed is very very very small. Free replacement batteries bought by HD and given away is an expense that they would rather not fulfill, so you have to jump through a few hoops as discouragement. The offer of free replacement encourages you to buy from HD and costs them nothing, untimely they have to make good after a period of time. If it was a matter of simply walking in with a battery for exchange they probably would not be able to afford the generous warranty. Making the customer resister and send off for replacement parts after the sale is an convenience that most will forget or not have time to wait for.
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On 9/2/14, 8:26 AM, Leon wrote:

I guess I didn't see the registration process as jumping through hoops. We've become so accustomed to instant access/results from everything these days that filling out a registration card and mailing it in with a receipt is seen as jumping through hoops.
Last I checked, those batteries were about a hundred a pop. It took me about 45 mins to complete my registration process. I don't know about you, but I don't make $267/hr. :-)
I haven't had to *use* my warranty yet, however. We'll see how easy the process is whenever that happens. Maybe I'll be back here b!t@hing and moaning about it then, who knows? :-)
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