Leveling garage floor

I am turning half of my two car garage into a workshop. The floor slopes from house to the garage door with a difference of about 3" from beginning to end. I would like to level up this one side and do it with wood to save my back. What would be the best way to do this?
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Just James

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I'd seriously look in to a leveling compound. Concrete and wood don't often play nice with each other, so by the time you've bought and hauled pressure treated or extra foam padding, you might as well have gotten the leveling compound.
Puckdropper
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That's a LOT of leveling compound, and that stuff ain't cheap. And I doubt it's durable enough for a shop floor without some other cover (linoleum, etc.). And, if you're ever going to move, consider how you'd deal with the wedge of leveling compound. Not to mention building codes.....
I'd consider living with the slope by adjusting your tool stands, and getting good matts.
-Zz
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Puckdropper wrote:

Leveling compound? How is that much different than just pouring a floor over the one I have? I have seem many instances where a wood floor was put on concrete without leveling the concrete first.
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Just James

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I did a room a bit bigger than that size by scribing sleepers to the floor and cutting them on my band saw. Then I put insulation between the sleepers and topped with 3/4" T&G sub-flooring. I screwed the sleepers down to the slab with Tapcon screws with sill sealer between the wood and concrete for an air/moisture barrier. They could be shot down or attached with some other type of concrete anchor too.
I am misrepresenting my role here a bit... my kids did a bunch of the scribing and other work for me. They were 8 and 10 at the time and did a fine job after I showed them how... I think their naturally being close to the ground was an asset here compared to me kneeling and bending. ;~) I'll post a few photos to ABPW of the boys at work and one that shows the extreme variance I had to work with to deal with a concrete ramp and varying floor heights.
John
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On Mon, 5 Jan 2009 19:52:56 -0500, "John Grossbohlin"

...the sleeper route is best, I think. Are you framing a wall between garage and where you're leveling? If you are it makes it a bit easier to stage the first of the sleepers. Anything like this that I've done, and there've been a few over the years, always starts with getting the end pieces cut and making sure they are level...once that is accomplished it's a matter of stringing between them at the thick end and checking each piece after the initial cut with a straightedge (like a screed) and adjusting if need be with shims or trimming. 'Tween you and me (heh) I usually go from nothing to whatever the large measurement is, snap a line on the stock, and blaze away with a Skillsaw. If your largest measurement is 3" then 2x4 stock would garner two ripped pieces so when you lay 'em down the factory edge is on top...needless to say, these pieces should span the entire distance; that way you don't have to piece anything in. Attachment is up to your discretion depending on weather conditions and how your slab is affected.
cg
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Charlie Groh wrote:

I had not considered putting up a wall, but that is an idea too. I am new to wood having only built a few things, so I generally need a picture of what is being described, but I think I get what you are saying here.
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I guess I don't understand your purpose in leveling the work area. Is it so your machines will sit level? If that is the reason get some heavy duty leveling screw pads to put under the corners of your machines.
If it is because you just want to stand on a level surface buy a pair of Dr. Scholl's gel pad inserts. Put the Gel Pad in your "downhill" foot and leave it out of the uphill foot. Total cost $4.00. Find a friend that has a garage floor sloping the other direction and split the cost.
GL2
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On Mon, 5 Jan 2009 21:42:32 -0800 (PST), TwoGuns

...LOL, I second the motion!
cg
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TwoGuns wrote:

The purpose is both. I want to save my back and have a level surface to work on. The trouble I currently have is the space is just small, so all the tools have to be pressed near the wall and moved out to use. Specifically the table saw. It is on locking casters and it gets stuck just trying to pull it out and turn it the right direction.
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