Leveling a miter saw.

I have a small shelf setup between two work benches. The ramp is lower than the tables, to accept a miter saw.
The problem is getting the miter saw to be completely level between the two tables. I would love to be able to adjust each corner of the saw, so in essence I get one long even surface (the two benches and the cutting surface of the saw). I tried shims, but would prefer something more easily adjusted.
Suggestions?
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On Fri, 28 Aug 2009 17:41:55 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"

Leveling pads on the legs?
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are they adjustable?
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On Fri, 28 Aug 2009 18:51:04 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"

Sure, they're used all the time. They screw into the bottoms using a 3/8", or some such, bolt. Turn the pad to adjust and then lock with a jamb nut.
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On Fri, 28 Aug 2009 17:41:55 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"

If it's only off a slight amount try using Post-It notes. I use them frequently for minute adjustments. Each piece of paper is approximately 0.004" thick.
Gordon Shumway
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You can mount it on 4 long bols or all thread rod. Have an extra nut on each one, under the saw and you can raise and lower all 4 corners until it's level and then lock it donw with a nut over the top. This is typically called a standoff when used in mounting electronic boards so if my description sucks, google standoff.
On my current setup I made the whole lower shelf between the two tables mounted with slots so I can dial in the level. I have a 2x4 in front and back of the table that run past the table legs. slots in the table legs and a piece of 1" ply making the shelf that rests on the 2x's. Plus it is bolted through the slots so I can disassemble and move easily when needed, although I sunk some deck screws into it once I got it leveled for extra security.
wrote:

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Just a reality check here, and I at one time had a miter on a similar set up. While it would be nice to have everything nice and level with the saw, you really don't need it to be, with in reason. Miter saws are designed to be used all by them selves. They don't need wings on either side to be perfectly aligned. My wings were "slightly" lower than either side of the saw table.
The big problem is not only getting the saw table to be on the same plane as the side tables/wings, those side tables have to be coplaner to each other too.
It can be done, but does it have to be done? I don't think so. Mu wife is a wuilter and uses a long arm mvhine that rides on 4 sections of track, 2 in front 2 in back. They all have to be coplaner because the machine has to stay put at any location that she rolls it to on the tracks. I ended up using 8 screw adjustable feet and t-nuts on the bottoms of the rail ties. The feet on either end and in the middle of the 11' tracks set on two seperate tables on a ceramic tile floor. This is all portable so the tables are always unlevel to each other.
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wrote:

...this is the gist...I use all kinds of tables, horses, garbage cans or whatever to get my CMS to work in the field, and it's pretty similar at home, LOL...I actually built a "mini-table" 'bout the size of those extensions they give you; it seats the saw in a depression with a buildup on each side at the same height as the table of the saw...maybe extending a foot on either side. I did this for one saw years ago and now have 4 set-up that way, fully attached...usually I don't need anything other than something to set the thing on, but if I'm dealing with long stuff it's just a matter of some ingenuity and is dealt with in minutes, if not seconds. For the OP, the main problem is planing on either side, not so much "level."
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I learned a long time ago, a piece of 1 by on top of a piece of 2by is just right for my saw. LOL, so scientific. At home, I used some salvaged kitchen cabs with a lowered piece of countertop between them as my miter box station. I spent some time getting the counter on each side coplanar. Then I spent some time getting the center shelf parallel and at the right height for the saw using shims. It should be easy enough to remove a couple screws and re-shim, when I replace the saw.
Ed
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I built this one almost 20 years ago. I've never had a reason to change. Works as both portable and shop mounted on a stand with wheels.
http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base_images/zp/job_site_miter_saw_stand.gif
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wrote:

Today a miter saw, maybe tomorrow a router table, or a drill press, or a disk sander, or whatever. I'd consider making fittings on the two work benches, either to take a shelf or to engage the miter saw's worktop some other way (hinge connection, yank the hinge pins and the miter saw comes free?). In any case, it should easily dismount so some other useful item can occupy the gap.
Best case, it should be custom-fit to the miter saw and notched into the wood of the workbenches so it'll never slip.
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