Left Hand chuck screw

I am sure this is a common problem some of you have already solved.
Where to find a left hand screw to hold the chuck for a drill? The dealer Harbor Freight is no help.
6mm dia; 25mm long; any kind of head.
Thanks
Mauro Gaetano
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Hi Mauro.
Sadly it is not that simple, we carry at least 15 different one's, seems to be no rhyme or reason to the head, length, diameter, thread, slotted, torx, phillips, hex...metric? imperial?? What make / model is the drill? what size chuck? what diameter spindle even effects the size of screw used, some 1/2" chucked drills even have the spindle more suited to 3/8" & vise verse....from there I might just be able to help, even after over 15 years in the power tool business I still come up with yet another different left hand screw every now & then.
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PTM, Along that line, any idea where to find a set of left hand bits? A friend of mine worked at a Datsun (before they went to Nissan) dealer and he had about 8 or 10 left twist drill bits. He would chuck them up in an air drill to drill out broken studs in the manifolds or what ever. I asked a MAC tool distributor the other day, and he looked at me like I was nuts. I haven't DAGS yet, but I saw this thread and thought I'd just ask. It is a serious question BTW.
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out a stud or broken bolt, I've used a standard (right-handed) drill bit, and an Easy-Out. Are you sure that's not what your friend had?
-- Regards, Doug Miller
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wrote:

http://www.mytoolstore.com/hanson/hanson.html
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Doug Miller wrote:

Any of the machine tool suppliers have left hand drills. MSC Travers McMaster-Carr etc. ...lew...
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Try MSC at www.mscdirect.com (I think that's the address anyway)
and
www.jlindustrial.com
LOTS of left handed drill bits in all sizes are readily available due to the large numbers of Swiss automatic screw machines that are left handed.
Mike
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I had 5 sets of 10 or 12 double ended left hand drill bits that I sold to our local machine shop, it did not have a name on it but the index case was stamped Swiss made, they were about four inches long & there was only about an inch of spiral at each end, I was told they were for production drill presses, reversible & very high quality, I picked them up at a yard sale of a retired tool & die maker for $5. The machine shop gave me $60 for them & could not believe I would sell them so cheap. The ones you describe sound more like easy outs but might have been left hand bits.
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Jerry Gilreath wrote:

simple search     http://www.mytoolstore.com/hanson/hanson.html
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Well Jerry, you are not nuts, when I did AGS for the chuck screw I got hundreds of hits for Left Hand drill bits and just then learned that they are used to drill out broken studs. Automotive supply may have them.
Good luck.
MG

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Many thanks all. As I said, I was just passing through and saw this thread and thought I would ask. I knew they made them. His air drill only went one way, and if the stud wasn't rusted in there too bad, he could slow it down, and as the left twist bit went in, it would work the same way as an easy out, most of the time. If it didn't, he had a hole already drilled for the easy out. Thanks again all. I'm going to get a few to have around. One never knows when one might have a need for one.
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Thank you PowerToolMan
The screw is for a Harbor Freight 1/2" drill Model 07426 made by Chicago Industrial or something like that.
Dimensions: 24 mm all threaded shank below the head. 5.9mm diameter, a 6mm nominal 1mm pitch as far as I can tell, counting the threads and comparing with a RH 6mm Slotted Head, Cylindrical 10mm dia 3.8mm thick Black anodized, it broke wirh a glassy snap as if it was tempered.
If you are able to sell a couple you may e-mail directly the name is: gaetanos followed by a funny A, then mind spring point com ( the mind and the spring form a single word). Sorry for the extra work to reassemble the address but I get enough junk already.
Regards
Mauro Gaetano

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MG wrote:

You mean "hardened" and NOT "temperd" :-( I get discouraged hearing folks use tempered for hardened.
...lew...
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You are correct. It is a habit of mine beacuse in my native language Tempered is used to define Hardened. Even in italian is a wrong use of the term because tempered measn kind of mellow which is what you usually do after the Hardenening process.
MG

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Sorry but in this instance I cannot be of much help, Here in Canada we do not have Harbor Freight or Chicago Industrial??? however if Harbor Freight cannot get you the simple part they are not trying.
On the subject of Chicago ELECTRIC power tools :
The only tool from the States called Chicago ELECTRIC power tools we have had here for service recently was a really poorly built Grey & Yellow 12" sliding compound miter saw.....stripped gear & drive end of armature on the first job he did with it last summer, poor machining a generally crap overall, really high & unbalanced in design, it was purchased in the US by one of our customers that spend the winters in Florida last year, if it is the same company as that one....good luck. He took it back with him this winter in hopes to get it replaced it looked like it was not even worth $175.
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Chicago Electric is Harbor Freight's store brand for generic import tools.
For the original poster, there are only a few sizes of drill chuck screw out there, unless HF has invented some new ones. A decent shop servicing power tools or selling repair parts should have some sizes on hand or know where to get them.
GTO(John)

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Yes that's true in away compared to other screws & bolts I suppose, but at our location we have a tray to select from that started at about 8 different ones but has grown to over 20 in the last fifteen years or so due to different shaped & sized heads, lengths, threads, diameters etc some have phillips, slotted, allen, or torx drive, some come with a tread lock compound already on them, some are fully threaded & others have a section without thread. Makita alone have about 8 different ones...seriously & not many are interchangeable believe me.
As you may know if the screw does not seat fully & tight the chuck can turn on the spindle & snap the screw head clean off or even damage the screw or spindles threads under torque. Many chucks need replacement because the screw head was not fully seated & the jaws have been damaged from binding on it among other reasons....the Chinese imported tools are famous for that & often a decent chuck replacement is as expensive as the drill cost.
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