Least smelly finish


Hi,
I have recently asked about the least obtrusive finish, but what about the least smelly one?
What I'm thinking of is how to finish the *insides* of drawers. Obviously the look is not important. The important thing is that the insides of the drawers never end up smelling like the finish.
Thanks!
Aaron Fude
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If the look is truly Obviously not important, don't use a finish at all.
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Shellac.
charlie b
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While shellac is a real good choice it would be my second choice to clear water based acrylic.
We use both extensivly in our vintage travel trailer restoration shop. Amber shelac for color and depth and water based acrylic for a tough top coat. Solvent based finishes will be phased out in most of our life times so you might as well find a water based finish you like.
AZCRAIG
www.vintagetrailersforsale.com

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cm wrote:

I suspect that ecosteria will be phased out before that happens.

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--John
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If that's the case, we'll have to leave everything unfinished. Water is a solvent.
depth and water based acrylic for a tough top coat.

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Yup....Water is a solvent, but in the finishing business they are considered either water based/borne or Solvent based.
AZCRAIG
www.vintagetrailersforsale.com
wrote in message > shelac for color and

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Leon Wrote: > snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in message

> about

but Varathane was bought by Rustoleum. It is still called Diamond Finish. I apply it with a flat short haired applicator. Sand the first coat and apply a second. It lays down like a spray finish and is water based and nearly odorless.
Chuck
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oneartist


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I've had very good luck with shellac. Seems to dissipate rapidly and makes a good seal and it easy to keep clean.
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Another vote for shellac. Very fast drying, no lingering odor, and if your'e restoring, it's also a good barrier coat to seal funky-smelling old drawers
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On 5 Aug 2006 08:44:37 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The least smelly is probably not the best for drawer interiors. But to answer your question, wax is probably the least smelly of all.
For interior of drawers I recommend a spit coat of clear shellac.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Nothing says they have to have a finish. Personally, I oil them...with oil to which I have added some oil of wintergreen. I like the odor, reminds me of the trombone slide oil I used to make. It had wintergreen in it too.
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dadiOH
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