Learned something new yesterday

Guy decides to use his router to plow some grooves in plywood instead of putting the dado blade on the TS. He needed the groove to be a hair over 3/4" so he put in a 5/8 bit and set the fence for the first pass. Cut all of the pieces without trouble with this setup. Then he adjusted the fence for the second pass and nibbled a little of the end of the test piece and checked the fit. Just where he wanted it, now to make the final cut (know where this is going yet?).
He starts feeding the piece through and about halfway thru the cut the piece flies off the router table! He picks up the piece and examines it, must have been that knot that flung it out. Good thing it was the test piece. Starts on the next one and halfway through the piece flies off the table. WTF!
Shuts everything down. Look at the router table wondering which is left and right, start thinking back to the craftsman table he used to have...which way did that arrow point? No. I'm going the right way, it must be the x-grain of the plywood causing the problem. Lets try this again...
Doesn't fly off the table this time, but almost. Newbie examines the bit expecting to find a bent cutter or some other explanation other than user error, nope. Then he looks at mangled piece expecting the wood to say 'sorry won't happen again', no response. Grasping wildly the newbie decides that the router must be spinning backwards... time for a break.
A few minutes sitting on the chair trying to figure out how the polarity was reversed in his router helped the newbie realized he was trying to cut on the back side of the bit.
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Mon, Nov 6, 2006, 6:21am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (RayV) doth exclaims "eureka": <snip> A few minutes sitting on the chair trying to figure out how thepolarity was reversed in his router helped the newbie realized he was trying to cut on the back side of the bit.
Don't know if I've ever heard it called a "chair" before. But like I always say, a few minutes there thinking things over is always a problem solver. More people should try thinking their, rather than just stinking.
Amazing what running the piece the wrong way on the spin of the bit makes.
JOAT If you're not making a rocket, it ain't rocket science.
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J T wrote:

me to sand down months ago so she could repaint it. Maybe the multi-master will be under the tree this year...
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Mon, Nov 6, 2006, 10:16am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (RayV) doth sayeth: Not that chair, the painted Windsor chair in the shop <snip>
I suppose that would work too. Except then you're not multi-tasking.
JOAT Want cheap gas? Pull my finger.
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Every boatshop has a 'Moaning Chair'.
The other is the 'LL' . . . Latrine Library, or 'Head' for the nautically inclined.
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop
(RayV) doth

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"Ron Magen" wrote in message

A certain boat building company out of Pascagoula, MS used to outfit their 130' seismograph work boats with "heads", always mounted as far forward as possible in the bow, below decks, and high enough off the deck to where even Yao Ming's feet wouldn't touch.
Just imagine using one of these "bucking heads" when running into a rough sea ... it helped to have rodeo'ed a bit.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/29/06
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OK, I am confused, what did you learn? Did I miss some detail?

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Well I guess the last part of the last sentence explains it all. :~) Nevermind.
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Yes:
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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RayV wrote:

Help me understand what the 'back side of the bit' means. Was this a straight bit, or a rabbet bit? Are you saying the workpiece was between the bit and the fence?
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Todd the wood junkie wrote:

the bit, rather than into the cutting edge. In other words, on a standard router table setup, he was feeding left to right instead of right to left.
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Charlie M. 1958 wrote:

Sort of. I was feeding right to left and this was fine for the first pass on the dado cut. The problem came when I moved the fence closer to the bit and was cutting the dado wider. The portion being cut was between the fence and the bit. Rather than reset the fence I decided to make the second cut by feeding right to left.
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RayV wrote:

be kinda fun to set up in an open area and see how far you get the workpiece to shoot that way. <g>
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You might want to take a look at <http://home.att.net/~waterfront-woods/Articles/Climb-Chip-Cutting.html
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RayV wrote:

Sounds like the same principle of a climb cut only with a reverse feed direction (right to left), since you had the material between the fence and the bit.
Normally on a climb cut you are going left to right with the bit between the material and the fence (and saying hail Marys the whole time).
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Badly put (what's the backside of a round?) but I assume he means climb cutting.

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