Leaning furniture??

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I was more concerned with the mark/screw/hole left there if that piece of furniture had to be moved somewhere else. Certainly not an irreparable thing to fix, but a pain anyway. Even the slightest move would negate the existing form of attachment.
Many/most pieces of furniture or shelving in my place is moved a little bit on occasion. Fastening one of these pieces of furniture being discussed is almost tantamount to a built in wall unit ~ it has to stay exactly where it is, at least in my opinion.
They're designed to look like a free floating piece of furniture, but they're exactly the opposite.
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On 10/19/2012 8:35 AM, Dave wrote:

Safety ALWAYS has consequences/inconveniences ... it's life. Those who refuse to acknowledge that fact are fools who do not deserve my participation in their folly.
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You bet. I picked up a freebie tall bookshelf unit a couple years ago and the first thing I did was put an L bracket into it and the wall at the back of the top shelf. It won't be falling on me or anyone else. I've also noticed loose shelves at client homes and talked them into letting me secure the units to the wall for them.

One Atta Boy comin' your way, Swingy. Let someone else's insurance company take the fall for people's stupidity.
-- Fear not those who argue but those who dodge. -- Marie Ebner von Eschenbach
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On Friday, October 19, 2012 8:20:57 AM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

Happen to come across this - http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=vintage+hardware+display+accessory&qs=n&form=QBIR&pq=vintage+hardware+display+accessory&sc=0-0&sp=-1&sk=#view=detail&id=9B1E8294178DE2ED1A267A502A0D84CFD857FAF6&selectedIndex=238 - which is very similar to your initial SketchUp. Described as a display shelf. I suppose it can't be top loaded with heavy items, but it looks nice for a home setting. Possibly what your customer had in mind?
Or have you finished with that project? I'd be interested in seeing what you ended up making. Sonny
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On 11/16/2012 8:22 AM, Sonny wrote:

Merci, cher!

Actually, did not hear back from the prospective client for a few of weeks, then, as soon as I start on something else, we suddenly want to start perfecting the design. ;0>
Here is where that project is, as far as the basic design (no trim, etc), as of earlier this week:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff#5811438004433634706
Latest email (last evening) leads me to believe that it will be built pretty much as drawn, but with some dimensional changes for greater utility of that top cabinet for paper storage, and trim elements (in contrasting woods?), etc.
I'll keep you posted here, and thanks again for your help, and interest.
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On 10/18/2012 10:45 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Key hole slots on the back side of eaach leg at the top and a single screw in the wall on each side to fit in those slots.
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On 10/19/2012 7:34 AM, Leon wrote:

Bingo ...
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On 10/19/2012 11:08 AM, Swingman wrote:

Maybe simpler, a screw behind the drawers. Access by removing the drawer. A little less touchy in placement to hit at least one stud.
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Hmmm. I might build furniture like that, but I`d sure be looking for a way to fasten it to the wall. I`d probably also be looking for a way to easily unfasten it too and move it on occasion.
Sounds like a real pain to me. Glad in this case anyway, that I`m not building any of this furniture to a customer`s order.
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On 10/18/2012 3:54 PM, Swingman wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff#5800748174119096498
In the drawing with the feet, if you add the feet to the top but extending out you could add a wide, from the wall, shelf to hold lighting that shines down on the desk top. That would also help hide a wall anchor/attachment.
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wrote:

I was thinking "top shelf", too, but with lag-end rods which fit into the box beam shelf, spaced at 16" OC for the studs. BR230 - Shelf Support at http://tinyurl.com/88a2m8g
-- Fear not those who argue but those who dodge. -- Marie Ebner von Eschenbach
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On Thu, 18 Oct 2012 15:54:34 -0500, Swingman wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff#5800748174119096498
I was looking through some of my Shaker furniture books a few days ago and there is an example hanging shelves arranged on about the same angle as your example.
Although the Shaker shelves aren't a piece of leaning furniture, the appearance is much the same.
basilisk
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Which book is that?
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 22:55:08 -0500, Swingman wrote:

Making Authentic Shaker Furniture
Subtitle: With measured drawings of museum classics. Author John G. Shea published originally in 1971, while there were still a few shakers living.
basilisk
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On 10/20/2012 1:16 PM, basilisk wrote:

Thanks!
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On Saturday, October 20, 2012 1:39:45 PM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

The book Bill mentioned, and I ordered, "Furniture Treasures", and the other book I had mentioned, "The Early Furniture of French Canada", came in today. I glanced through them and the "French" book has a few pics of consoles, which appear to be leaning furniture, circa late 18th c. and early 19th c. It states they were common in churches, on one or each side of the altar. Also, they were in high end homes, of the times. The pics and discussion is in the section with trestle tables. There is similar discussion, regarding trestles tables only, in the Furniture Treasury book. The French book comments about modifications of the trestle table.
The Furniture Treasures book (Volume 3, pg 123) comments on trestle tables, in that, ...referring to plates (pics) 800- 802, "There is known to the author only one other long Pilgrim period trestle, that being in the Bolles Collection, Metropolitan Museum. One or two short examples, like 805, have recently been found. The collector should be very careful not to confuse the Shaker type of the early 19th century with a true Middle Age trestle and board table." *A board table MAY be a sideboard, as there is discussion of sideboards in the previous section. I highly suspect sideboards (or board tables), mentioned as being here in the sates, may be the same as the consoles, mentioned in the French Canada book. The discussions are very similar.
The writer says this board table was common in England and some samples were found in North Carolina. The writer has not come upon an American example, but such probably exist, or did. *Again, I've been just scanning and reading some parts.
Apparently, leaning tables, or shelf type furniture, have been around, in some form, for a long time, and even the Shakers may have had some sort of leaning shelf or table, as Basilisk mentions. A further (French) name, noted in the French book, for the console table is credences. Other examples of variations of the console table is demi-lune tables (old samples in the books, modern samples in the link ~~~>) http://www.bing.com/search?q=demi-lune+table&src=IE-SearchBox&FORM=IE8SRC .
Some of these old tables look neat. Lots of good pics in each of these books. Pics are of furniture dating back to the 1600s. Shows, pretty well, the progression of design(s) over time. Sonny
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On Sat, 20 Oct 2012 15:00:15 -0700, Sonny wrote:

when you get the book the shelves I was pointing out are on page 121, they aren't leaning but hanging. They have graduated shelf widths from top to bottom. The style to me was strikingly similar, with the added bonus of not being unstable. (when anchored leaning is fine)
I like several of the pieces in this book, in particular, the bench on 124 and the pedestal table on 183.
When I get the time, I may replace all the end tables in the LR with these. I'll need 4 and they will go quickly making several at the time.
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On Sat, 20 Oct 2012 15:00:15 -0700, Sonny wrote:

I misread what you wrote Sonny, I thought you had ordered the book I mentioned, my name is Bill also, got ahead of myself posting.
basilisk
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I have the PDF version of the "treasure" book and can't find anything leaning in the trestle table section? I'm going to try and find a copy of the French book, sounds interesting. A "console" table to me has always been a narrow table, not unlike the "sofa" table I just built. :)
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The trestle table, itself, is not leaning. The progression of design seems to have led to or from the leaning aspect. In the progression of design, seems a basic trestle table (typical commoner's dining furniture) was shortened, then had a folding side (placed against the wall) and became, what we know today as, a demilune. Modifications, along this path, resulted in some examples looking like leaning furniture.
Also, seems the different terms, used back then, are not the same as today, like "consoles".
Here are some pics from the French book of "consoles", which appear to be a type of leaning furniture - a half table, with 2 legs, leaning against the wall. I would suspect the table is attached to the wall. http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04 /
I paid $12.99 for Furniture Treasury Volume 3 and $16.04 for Volumes 1&2 (one book)... *this included shipping. The inside dust jacket of Vol 3 has a price tag of $24.95. The pages are rough paper, kind of reminds me of old writing tablet paper in grade school.
Furniture Treasury Vol 1&2 (one book) has very nice smooth quality paper, appropriate for color plates, pictures and such. This book looks new, though it was advertised as used. The inside dust cover has a price tag of $100/$140 Canadian. Both Furniture Treasury books measure 8" X 11". Both of these books were labeled, on Amazon, as "used, very good condition" and they are in great condition.
I paid $38.99, including shipping, for The Early Furniture of French Canada. High quality paper, appropriate for the color plates and other excellent pictures. It was advertised on Amazon as "used, very good condition". It is used in good condition and has some slight yellowing around the edges of the pages. No pages torn. The dust cover has slight wear. The book measures 10" X12-1/2" and is hefty as the others. I think this book stopped being published in 1963, so it has some age to it, but still in great shape. No price tag on it, but there is $54 hand written on the inside cover. Sonny
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