Leaks in Air Compressor Lines - Black Iron Pipe

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Bob suggested ...

the time I was done, and all appears to be leak free. Whatever pipe sealant they sold my at Home Depot you can wipe your arse with.
Now that the system is up and running, it's time to shop for nailers.
Joe
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On 25 Jan 2004 21:20:11 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@execpc.com (BIG JOE) wrote:

Out of nowhere comes another useless Home Depot dig. Since HD does not have store brand items (except for Ridgid) the pipe sealant is probably sold in thousands of other stores and plumbing suppliers. Why pick on HD?
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Gee Bob, maybe because the Home Depot employee grabbed it off the f*cking shelf and handed it to me. "This will work for what you're doing."
BTW: Many Ridgid items are sold elsewhere.
Joe

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I'm not Bob but I can tell you that I've had the exact same problem with pipe dope I've picked up at my plumbing supplier. The stuff you purchased is fine, nothing wrong with it. It's the treads of the fittings and/or pipe. Please trust me for a second on this, the fittings from even the most trusted supplier can be suspect. Pipe threads can vary just because of the amount of wear on the cutters at the time they were cut, let alone where they might be made now, Tiawan is a big producer as well as others. I'm not a plumber (am a contractor) but the other 3 male members of my family are so I learned years ago to use 2-3 wraps of teflon tape with a dose of pipe dope added to insure a good seal. Anyone that says they get a perfect seal every time with just dope is blowing smoke up your ass because they haven't done much of it, if any.
BTW, Ridgid woodworking tools are only sold at HD. Their line of plumbing tools (great products) are sold in many places.
Scott
-- An unkind remark is like a killing frost. No matter how much it warms up later, the damage remains.
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Ok. Time for my two-cents worth on this topic. Coming in from the Industrial side of the fence, the first thing you learn is that to design a leak-free system, you do not use NPT threads, the kinds you find at the Borg (as you call them) and Lowes and such. It's everywhere!
Teflon tape is a great sealant, if used properly, and the only kind you need. The Teflon dope is a good lubricant and sealant, but I see no need to use both. If you wrap the pipe starting from the opening end back with a couple of wraps as Scott suggests, you'll be fine. If you come from the school of thought "if a couple is good, then four must be great!", you stand the risk of cracking the pipe while tightening it. Seen it happen.
In industry, beware of poor wrapping practices with teflon tape because pieces of the tape can get into valves and such and foul them. Imagine the same is true with nailers and other air tools.
Nailbender

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Nail Bender wrote:

Ok, so what kind of threads do you use, and where do you get 'em?
-- Mark
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Excuse me? I run allot of black gas pipe from time to time for my job. We use Rectorseal with teflon. Before that we just used plain ol' Rectorseal. Sure, I get a leak from time to time, but for the many thousands of feet of gas pipe I have threaded I assure you you can get a good seal with just pipe dope. We are not allowed to use teflon tape, it is against mechanical code in our area. I did a job a while back that feed 8 differant heating units, total load was around 2 million BTU. Ran about 300 feet of 2" black pipe, and about 150 feet of 1" pipe, plus 3/4" and 1/2" to connect the equipment. Put a pressure test on it at 2 pm Friday, and on Monday it was still holding, no loss in pressure at all. From what I see if someone gets a leak, the pipe was not tight enough! Sure, you can get a bad thread or fitting once in a while, but if I find a leak, 9 times out of ten it just needs another turn or two. 2" pipe for example I tighten with 24" pipe wrenches untill I can not turn it any more. Give it a few minutes and I can usually give it one more turn. Greg
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On 19 Jan 2004 15:25:26 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@execpc.com (BIG JOE) wrote:
Are you sure the system isn't leaking at your quick release fittings? These are the obvious leakers in any air system, and there is an enormous difference between good quick release fittings and cheap ones.

Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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Tim Carver wrote ...

garage), and the one and only normal coupling (i.e., not a union) in the system. I bought my quick release fittings at the best hardware store in town (UA100 will attest to that), because I'm aware of the quality issues with BORG stuff. They appear to be leak free.
Joe
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On 20 Jan 2004 07:18:17 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@execpc.com (BIG JOE) wrote:

since you often can't use a vise. Why not replace the coupling with a union, and replace the end cap with a union+nipple+endcap made up in a vise (so it will be nice and tight)? Seems like having your endcap on a stub+union would be better for future expansion anyway, you could just replace the capped stub with your new pipe later.
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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Plumbers mix this gray powder with water and apply that to threads before screwing together. I don't know what max pressures it will support, but I fixed my black pipe garage compressed air system using this. I remember how disappointed I was after final joint was completed and hearing the hiss. But that was nothing compared to my amazement at how #$!%*@ up some of the cut threads were. I mean holes between threads. Until now, I never paid that kind of attention to threads. I kinda remember about $4 at any plumbing shop. Also, its organic, but don't breath it. Dries in about an hour, 24 for full cure; its only the water that needs to evaporate. Good luck, Tom.
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I've worked with black pipe, PVC, and copper. For air lines, copper is king! :) Seriously, copper is light and easy to assemble leak free with a Mapp gas torch.
dave
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