leakproof wooden roof

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I'm building the "Better Homes & Garden's" storybook playhouse for the gchildren.
http://www.bhg.com/bhg/store/product.jhtml ;jsessionid=WPGBFGDKLRDHZQFIBQSB5VQ?catidΚt1190006&prodid=prod500272
The plan calls for bevelled siding to be used for roofing material, but is not too specific about how to leakproof the ridge, instructing only that a ridge cap be fashioned from pieces of 1x4. There is roofing felt (and plywood of course) under the siding.
If the ridge cap is to be leakproof, how exactly do I make it, and how do I attach it to the roof?
The small figurines on the top of the roof (see link above) are cut from plywood and set between two 2x2s, which are in turn "attached" to the ridge cap. Again, how best to do this without producing leaks.
Thanks.
George
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http://www.bhg.com/bhg/store/product.jhtml ;jsessionid=WPGBFGDKLRDHZQFIBQSB5VQ?catidΚt1190006&prodid=prod500272
Typically two boards a simply butted together and nailed, laid over the ridge, and attached with nails with the seam facing away from the prevailing winds. Alternatively, a dado can be cut in one board, the other board inserted into the dado and nailed--the board with the dado is generally a little wider than the other so that they look the same width when assembled. It wouldn't hurt to run a bead of construction adhesive along the joint prior to nailing.
I cannot tell from the picture for sure but if you have a 12/12 pitch the boards can probably just be nailed together. If the pitch is significantly different from 90 degrees a bevel should be cut, or the dado beveled, so that the boards lay on the roofing instead of sticking up with a space at the ridge.
John
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Thanks John.
Yes, it is 12x12 pitch, which would make it really easy to butt together the 1x4s at 90 degrees. Wouldn't nails through the ridge cap provide a channel for water entry? Maybe I'm overworrying.
George
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You could use a little adhesive roofing caulk under the ridge cap, where you expect the nails to penetrate.
All roofs leak, at least at the shingle level. Shingles, and their brothers, are really there to protect the roofing felt (tar paper or similar), whose job it is to shed water downward.
Now this stuff about dealing with ice dams is something you're going to have to deal with a Northerner about. To a Californian, it's pretty much theoretical stuff. It snowed here once, about 5 years ago. We had some hail this spring for 15 minutes.
Now fires & earthquakes, I can design for...
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote: ...

...
Old, traditional, wood shingle roofs were laid on open decking w/ no felt/paper. They will keep a building water tight just fine...our house has been that way for 90 years+ now. It gets a little wind-blown fine snow in the winter, but never enough to be serious...
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And there's a reason for that: They need to dry from underneath as well, or they rot.
I am continually amazed at the creativity of our forebearers, what they were able to do in the days before hardware stores and home centers, with local materials.
And I'm waiting for Andy to write one of his essays on the use of natural materials in pre-Industrial Britain, and enlighten us on the various kinds of bitumen used, and why.
;-)
Patriarch
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Patriarch wrote:

...
Which is why, if I had done what OP is, I'd have laid the roofing directly w/o the plywood...I'm surprised the plans called for solid decking in this application.
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The original footprint of the plan is 6'x4' so this might well have worked, but I thought the kids would outgrow it too quickly and changed it to 8'x6'. I also increased the ceiling height from 57' to 72' on the advice of the illustrious members of this NG a few seasons ago while I was still in the planning stages.
I just put up the plywood on the roof last weekend. It's looking good!
George
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George wrote:

It's not dimensions that concern me, it's the two layers of wood--the decking over solid ply that I think is asking for a moisture problem...for the purpose, I'd just lay the decking as the roofing, similar to a "classic" wood shingle roof so it has air movement on both sides of the siding.
What is the siding material?
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Do you mean the bevelled siding that will be on the roof? 10" bevelled siding. If I can get it in cedar I probably will.
George
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George wrote:

Yes, and most likely can...
I'm still concerned that it won't last nearly as long if you lay it over the solid decking as it would if you just nailed to to the rafters so it will have air access both sides...
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You could be right. The decking went up last weekend though, and I don't think it will be coming down again! This weekend is the siding/shingles.
Thanks & best regards, George
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Then consider using asphalt 3 tab shingles from the home center. You'll get 20+ years from them, I'd guess. They can be laid over the plywood deck easily, over $15 worth of roofing felt.
Patriarch
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A fiber ventilation mat is available for this purpose. It looks sort of like Cobra Vent only much wider and thinner. The idea is to allow air flow between the solid decking/felt paper and the wooden shingles.
John
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John Grossbohlin wrote:

That would undoubtedly be a good addition...
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On Wed, 29 Jun 2005 15:10:35 -0500, Duane Bozarth

Strap the plywood and put the bevelled siding above the plywood. Strap 1/2". Put the roofing felt UNDER the strapping.
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Um... you sure about that? For the most part shingles don't leak even without roofing felt. It has been done that way for hundreds of years.
-j
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On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 09:45:21 -0700, the opaque "J"

And with thatching/reeds/palm fronds (sans felt paper) for thousands of years before that.
--
A lot of folks can't understand how we came
to have an oil shortage here in America.
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If you use sufficient layers, yes. Roofing felt in lieu of heavier, more expensive, or thicker materials.
Or so I've been led to believe.
So Larry, how do you feel about roofing with kindling?
Patriarch
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George wrote:

...
You're overworrying... :) W/ a ridge cap of either wood shingles or metal, they're face nailed, anyway. Just use a galvanized (or SS if you really don't want any staining) 4d and nail away...
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