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On 2/6/2012 9:19 PM, CW wrote:

Any major name suppliers come to mind?
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"Leon" wrote in message

Any major name suppliers come to mind? =================================================================Kenametal, Hitachi, Iscar, Mitsubishi. There are many more but those come to mind. Tell the guy behind the counter what you are going to do with it and he should be able to set you up with a quality import that will work great for wood and will likely cost no more than $2.00 per insert. They are usually sold in boxes of ten. For 20 to 30 bucks you will be set for years. Finding a supplier should not be hard. Lots of things made in Texas.
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On 2/7/2012 2:36 PM, CW wrote:

Thanks I remember that... Now all I need to do if find a handle supplier. :~)
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On 2/5/2012 6:25 PM, Leon wrote:

I have the Easywood Mini finisher - it's the only tool I use anymore for pen turning. Works great!
Matt
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On 2/5/2012 10:18 PM, Matt wrote:

Great, I have heard nothing but good comments about the tools. Do they work well on the more exotic materials like the plastics, coffee beans, money blanks, etc?
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On 2/6/2012 5:13 AM, Leon wrote:

I much prefer it for the plastics and acrylics, even the Tru Stone blanks - cuts like the proverbial hot knife thru butter. As with all such blanks, you can still get chips now and then, just watch closely as you get down to the final shape. I've been known to put any tool aside and switch to 150 grit sandpaper if I have any doubts about it at that point, and I've been told I have a very soft touch with lathe tools. The only time I switch back to a regular chisel is when doing tenons on those pen styles that require them. Be aware that it can be a very aggressive tool, so "tread lightly" when first using it until you get a good feel for it.
Here's a link to my Etsy shop; all of the pens shown were turned using the Easywood mini finisher (including the few wood ones).
http://www.etsy.com/shop/emcefyrs
Matt
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On 2/6/2012 9:21 AM, Matt wrote:

Thank YOU I had left out the tru stone blanks but meant to ask so thanks for covering that. ;~)
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"Leon" wrote in message
On 2/5/2012 10:18 PM, Matt wrote:

Great, I have heard nothing but good comments about the tools. Do they work well on the more exotic materials like the plastics, coffee beans, money blanks, etc? ==================================================================They will work well anyplace any other scraper would work.
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On 2/6/2012 9:11 PM, CW wrote:

I was concerned about the more brittle nature of carbide when turning stone or metal.
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Leon - what is it that gets you on sharpening? Spindle gouges, roughing gouges, bowl gouges.... skews?
When I the turning bug really bad, I turned a few hours a week for several years. No piece of wood was safe, especially interesting FOG wood. (Found On Ground. ;^) )
I taught beginning and intermediate turning, and (of course) finishing. Part of my class was sharpening, and I taught how to use the Wolverine jig as well as homemade versions of the same for various gouges. I have turned enough personally that I sharpen freehand.
At the time our club was very active and we were able to afford some internationally known, excellent turners to come demonstrate for our club. Most were **great** guys, and even though they were masters of their craft, completely without pretense. Ask 'em anything, and they would tell you. Sharpening was always a hot topic, and they helped me get over any qualms about grinding my tools. I studied their tool edges carefully; never saw a perfect grind in my ten years at the club. Never. Not once, ever, did I see any gouge or chisel ground to look like those beautiful grinds from the factory.
Most were faceted, some kind of lopsided, and depending on the tool, just awful. Nonetheless, their work was superb. Collectively, their idea was that they sharpened to get the edge they wanted, and when that was gone, it was right back to the grinder for a touch up. They never fussed over an edge until they were at the finishing stage of things, and even then stressed a light touch over a supersharp tool. And being freehand sharpeners, they sharpened some wild profiles on their tools, and encouraged all of us to do the same.
I set aside my Sorby and other expensive tools, and found these tools
http://www.pennstateind.com/store/LCAN6M.html
that are an excellent value for midi users. (On sale I see, too!)
For a bigger lathe, I would tell the guys to get certain (or sets if on sale) from this selection:
http://www.pennstateind.com/store/woodturning-tools.html
Their tools are M2 high speed steel, and they hold their edges well and are easy to sharpen. That gave me the space to grind away on tools without thinking that every missed grind cost me $5 worth of steel. And I like their profiles so much (the gullets aren't so damn closed on their bowl gouges) I have happily bought many of their tools as preferred users.
In a rare stroke of inspiration, I had my students practice on something even cheaper. I had them get 1/4". 3/8" and 1/2" low carb steel rod from our local supplier, cut it into 10" lengths, and mount their "blanks" into a handle they turned. Then they could practice their sharpening on a piece of very inexpensive steel rod, not on a tool. This turned out to be very successful for some of them, and they learned spindle turning (handle), making their own tools, and sharpening in one project.
My only bugaboo is the skew. I can sharpen all of mine until you can literally shave hair. They are as sharp as my pocket knives. But unless it is a planing cut, I can't get it. When we had "open house" which was a chance for all of us to bring the tool(s) we couldn't use to get help from other turners, it was always the skew. I don't know what it is I can't see when using it, and it is really, really frustrating. I can use the tool when my skew buddy was standing there telling me to raise or lower my elbow, change my approach angle, or to angle the blade a certain way. By the time I got home, it was all lost. After hours and hours of failed attempts, I have given up. My skew is now used to open paint cans, scrape paint, knock the mud off my boots, weed the yard, etc.
Just kidding.
I now use what is known as the 180 grit skew in the form of sanding tape.
The tools you are looking at are machinist tools, and you can find many of the "bits" in a machinist's catalog. They are plentiful and cheap. They can be resharpened with diamond files like these
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2063622/24691/DMT-25-DiaSharp-Diamond-MiniHone-Sharpening-Stone-Fine.aspx
and their brothers. The only thing I don't like about those is the fact that they are still scrapers, not cutters. I have seen some lovely work in the right hands when using those tools, but never finish grade work. They do make excellent shape roughing tools, as well as the opposite end, detailing like rings, beads, etc, if you have enough room to get the holder in place.
Robert
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wrote in message wrote:
The tools you are looking at are machinist tools, and you can find many of the "bits" in a machinist's catalog. They are plentiful and cheap. They can be resharpened with diamond files like these
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2063622/24691/DMT-25-DiaSharp-Diamond-MiniHone-Sharpening-Stone-Fine.aspx
and their brothers. The only thing I don't like about those is the fact that they are still scrapers, not cutters. I have seen some lovely work in the right hands when using those tools, but never finish grade work. They do make excellent shape roughing tools, as well as the opposite end, detailing like rings, beads, etc, if you have enough room to get the holder in place.
Robert ========================================================================================I wondered why it was that so many dissed scrapers but seemed to think these were great. A scraper is a scraper no matter the material it is made of.
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On 2/6/2012 9:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2063622/24691/DMT-25-DiaSharp-Diamond-MiniHone-Sharpening-Stone-Fine.aspx
Well thanks for the detailed review Robert! ;~)
Now to answer your question, what gets me on sharpening.
The Tormek sharpener gets me.
Too messy. Too slow. Too complicated.
I have very successful reshaepening and like you the results are not the same as what the factory delivered but I can't tell any difference. ;~)
It probably takes me 15 minutes to simply get the sharpener ready to go and the tool correctly inserted in the correct adapter. And then it is another adapter for a different tool. And then clean up is a bit time consuming and water is everywhere.
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I'm guessing it would be fine for getting that great edge on knives or similar tools. That's one area I like my cutting tool to be razor sharp, especially so when I'm entertaining. It's then that I like the knife to be so sharp you only need to wave it at your prime rib and the entire roast falls over perfectly sliced.
Seeing Robert's comments on not needing a specifically shaped edge for turning tools, it looks like all you need is most any sharp edge as long as you hold it at the correct angle.
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Yup!
------- "Dave" wrote in message
I'm guessing
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On 2/7/2012 8:34 AM, Dave wrote:

The Tormek does do a good job on knives and scissors and rather quickly but then The WorkSharp systems do too and much less expensively.
The trouble with those items is that they do not dull as quickly or often as the tools I use in the shop. ;~)
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wrote:

I agree. We have one of the most talented carvers I have ever met or see right here in San Antonio. Sadly, he is an eccetric (how's that ofr PC?), and prefers to work only when he needs money.
The other time he works is to support his native Indian causes. He doesn't make garden gnomes, Santas, or elves. He carves things like real-size buffalo head nickels with all detailing except text. He carves cameos from exotic woods, and carves holy figurines for churches.
And he sleeps a lot in his shop while dreaming of projects.
Great guy. Tried to do a small project with him and we got stuck on something called a "schedule". It was a new word for him, and we should have defined it up front. We are better off friends.
BTW, he never sharpens his tools. He reprofiles to the shape he wants, then uses a strop and green diamond compound to re-hone the edges.
Oddly... he can't sharpen a pocket knife...
Robert
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*snip*

That seems to work rather well. I've got the leather wheel and green compound for the Work Sharp, and after using a chisel give it a touch on the wheel before putting it away.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On Wed, 8 Feb 2012 10:06:51 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Who's to say that he could keep up his artistic talent and expert workmanship for 40 hours a week, every drudging week?

Thank Tankashila for that.

Um, oh.

See? I toldja so.

It's good that your friendship got through it intact.

Yeah, there's a heck of a lot of honing between sharpenings with a gouge.

Hah!
-- Energy and persistence alter all things. --Benjamin Franklin
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On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 18:36:24 -0800, Larry Jaques wrote:

Most of us know the following, but for those who haven't stopped to consider it:
The number of inches of wood removed in a carving is orders of magnitude less than the inches removed in a few minutes of turning.
Let's see - the lathe is turning at 2000rpm with a 6" diameter bowl blank on it so ...
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Yes, but the lathe has a 1/2 to 3 hp motor powering it. Someone else will have to figure the foot pounds of force where the 6 inch turning and the lathe gouge meet. I'm guessing its several times greater than the force applied by a human arm to the carving gouge where it meets the wood. Given the power provided by the lathe to force the wood into the lathe gouge, a lathe gouge can be very dull compared to a carving gouge powered by arm muscles. Jack hammers use dull cutting bits but still manage to cut concrete.
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