Lathe Safty

A while back some one asked if those clear plastic face shields work. I found the answer today, YES. My wife got me a set of bowl turning chisels for Christmas (why I have them now is another story). Not being a bowl turner I had to try them. Took an 8# block of ash out of the wood pile and put it on the lathe face plate. Turned it until the lathe stopped bouncing,and the shape was close, increased the speed a notch and started cutting the inside of the bowl. Next thing I know the whole shebang came off the lathe and hit me square in the face. Faceplate has a nice scuff mark on the shield and I had a nice break and cup of tea otherwise no damage, to me or the block of wood. Cause of incident, too light of screws holding wood to face plate, at least I learned.
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Good to hear it worked out okay.
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I have had a number of heavy metal objects hit my faceshield while doing grinding. I will not perform a variety of shop functions without a face shield. And mine is attached to a hard hat too.
Good for you. You got off easy. Let the safety equipment take the hit. That way we don't scar up our pretty faces!
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No danger of scaring a pertty face here.

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sweet sawdust wrote:

Did the screws break, or just lose their grip (i.e. not long enough)? PS: Never use drywall screws, as they're too brittle. Tom
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Lost thier grip. I went to 4 longer course drywall screws with 4 regular flat head screwswith a finer thread. I figure the flatheds will hold the bowl on and the dry wall screws are just for back up.

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I'm glad you weren't hurt.
Now for my canned spiel every time the topic of eye protection comes up: There are other things on your face besides your eyes that need protection. Good thing you were wearing a face shield instead of just goggles.
Where do you figure it would have whacked you if you'd been wearing goggles and no shield? Nose? Teeth?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

I couldn't agree more. Yet there are those that feel like there is a predictable flight path for wood that leaves the lathe, and that using simple prudence is almost safety factor enough. Citing all manner of laws of physics, etc., they feel comfortable without a shield.
Obviously they just haven't been whacked in the head like OP. Good for OP for wearing the proper gear. Face shields are cheap enough, and even cooler than googles and provide much more protection.
Robert
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On Fri, 22 Dec 2006 06:01:17 -0800, nailshooter41 wrote:

It's funny how people who aren't physicists are such experts on the laws of physics. Generally it means that they've never actually had to solve the equations. A simple pendulum is bad enough the first time, when you get to unconstrained motion of an irregularly shaped object in three dimensions with rotation and both elastic and inelastic deformations then it's "watch me bring the Cray to its knees" time, without heavy duty number crunching all you can say that has real relevance is "incoming" as you duck and cover.

--
--John
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I sat on a Cray X-MP at NCSA once.
todd
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On Fri, 22 Dec 2006 21:13:33 -0600, todd wrote:

Cool. Always liked the way Cray tried to make their machines decor items.

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--John
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Suppose those might be the folks who cut above center, entering down for convex work and keep their toolrest close? If Newton's right, they get an opposite from their tool, and the rest takes any ricochet. Which they watch from a secure arm's length because they know better then to stand in front of poorly-held spinning objects or objects that might be propelled by spinning objects.
Always puzzles me when people talk about getting a board propelled into their gut by a tablesaw. What in the hell were they doing standing behind the thing anyway?
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(snip about people who think they can predict the flight path of a turning gone wild)
: Suppose those might be the folks who cut above center, entering down for : convex work and keep their toolrest close? If Newton's right, they get an : opposite from their tool, and the rest takes any ricochet.
The rest doesn't take any riccochet. And if ytou're referring to "every action has an opposite and equal reaction, once the tool catches and hits the rest, it stops, and the WOOD receives the opposing force, not the toolrest.
Which they watch : from a secure arm's length because they know better then to stand in front : of poorly-held spinning objects or objects that might be propelled by : spinning objects.
Sure, those are useful tips for decreasing the likelihood of a catch, and for decreasing the likelihood of getting hit.
But anyone who thinks that is going to provide complete protection all the time is ignorant (sometimes willfully so).
To give one data point, I was in the audience at a demo by Chris Stott, a professional woodturner. He was turning a bowl from green acacia, and it shattered. A piece hit the wall ten feet behind my head and bounced back and hit me in the back.
This piece was really sharp. It comes to a point sharp enough to go right through an eyeball if you got a direct hit. And I was some 15-20 feet away from the lathe, and not inline with what you would call the expected danger zone.
I keep that 5" fragment of wood right near my lathe as a reminder to always wear a face shield.
    -- Andy Barss
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wrote:

Nice thing about cutting as I recommended is that you _don't_ catch. The vectors involved try to push the tool away from the piece, thus the opposite is the piece is being pushed away from the tool and you. And I'll take the rest as protection over a mask, thank you. When the physical distance between the person and the piece is added in, it's a great combination.
Shavings never make it above the xiphoid, except when peeling inside. I get watching the opposite side of the bowl and the shavings tangle sometimes gets tossed in the air after being carried around and out. I have to remember to close my eyes when removing my glasses and brushing my hair, because they get caught on the lashes and lids, and sometimes I blink 'em in. Looks like time and an increasing forehead may make that moot soon, however.
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From the scuff mark and what I can remember seeing when it hit me, It would have been right in the left eye at about the eyebrow. I know it knocked me back a foot or so when it hit so it would have been a significant blow.
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The face shield probably saved you from a broken nose as well as an eye injury. Aren't you glad you had it on?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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The Only reason I had put it on was to protect me from flying chips. I will now rethink the chip protection and give it a better place in the shop were it gets dusted off more often, much more often. Just wish I could figure out a way to smoke my pipe when using it, oh well can't have everything. Guess I will forgo the pipe when turning, it is out most of the time anyway.
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On Fri, 22 Dec 2006 14:24:58 -0600, sweet sawdust wrote:

Hookah? Smoke will still get in your eyes though.

--
--John
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Now there is an idea! Maybe a small fan out of an old computer to blow the smoke away?
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