lathe -- opinions wanted

I've been wanting a lathe for some time. the price "seems" right. Opinions ( on the lathe :) )? http://wichita.craigslist.org/tls/5105117643.html Thanks,
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"sawdustmaker" wrote in message
I've been wanting a lathe for some time. the price "seems" right. Opinions ( on the lathe :) )? http://wichita.craigslist.org/tls/5105117643.html Thanks,
The lathe itself would make a reasonably good starter lathe. It's pretty well equipped with tooling, and seems to have been kept in good shape. From the tooling picture it looks like the headstock and tailstock have a #1 Morse taper, so you have good possibilities for other tooling. The headstock looks like it probably has a 3/4" x 16 thread and if so you can easily find adapters and faceplates and chucks that can hook up to that thread.
What makes it a good deal, though, is all the other stuff that comes with it. A pretty good table, looks like - there's probably a couple hundred dollars in labor just in the table - the grinder, and the chisels and other stuff. That Wolverine Vari-Grind is a fairly expensive and well-liked sharpening rig. You could actually throw the lathe away, and still feel like you'd spent your money well.
Grab the headstock shaft by the pulleys or the spur drive and wiggle it hard back and forth, to see if you can detect any slop in the headstock bearings. If so it's not too tough to replace them. And you'd probably want to work out some kind of guard for the belt.
My lathe is an even older Craftsman, the tube-type. I stripped it down and restored it and it's working OK for me but I'll make the step up to a more modern lathe one of these days. But right now I'm still having fun with it.
Tom
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It's still there, posted 22 days ago? You guys must be overly rich with wood lathes...
If around here, I'd be going to see it with $200 in my pocket.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On Sat, 25 Jul 2015 18:51:31 GMT

buy it cannot see any downside at all
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On 2015-07-26 00:49:44 +0000, Electric Comet said:

The only downside I can see is that it seems to have bronze bushings rather than ball bearings. Ball bearings are easy to replace. Bronze a major, especially if the shat is scored.
CP
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This is a decent lathe for doing chair spindles, tool handles, etc. However it is under powered and 9" is rather small for bowls. The vari-grind is an accessory for the wolverine system, which does not appear in the picture. Also the chisels if they are high speed steel are ok, but not great.
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Try it to see if you like it. e.g. you are not dumping out 5K or so and find it isn't what you want. I have a Pre/Post WW II model - not tube. And that is what I use. The fact that the guy turned bowls on it means the bearings are likely ok. Learn how to use it and learn technique before you buy something else.
Martin
On 7/25/2015 1:51 PM, sawdustmaker wrote:

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On 25/07/2015 12:51 PM, sawdustmaker wrote:

It depends on what you have in mind. If you want it to turn spindles for chairs, then go ahead. If you want to turn a salad bowl then forget it! I started on a Craftsman but soon sold it when I realised its limitations. I then bought a General. These days there are so many Taiwanese lathes that won't cost you much more and will do a lot more. In addition, they are 1"x8, for which it is much easier to find chucks and spare faceplates. Just my 5c worth. Graham
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Slightly undecided. 9 inch swing is less than the mini lathes. Mini lathe s from Jet or Delta are 12 inch swing. 16 inch between center I think. Ma ybe 24 inches, not sure. This lathe is longer between center. But, almost no one turns more than about 12 inches between centers. People just do no t turn spindles. The Steelex tools are maybe high speed steel. But Harbor Freight sells the same set in HSS for about $40. I bought the Harbor Frei ght set. The mini turning tools aren't really useful. As already mentione d, it includes the Wolverine vari grind jig, but not the Wolverine system t hat goes under the grinder. The jig is $50 or so, but the whole Wolverine system is $150 or so. It looks like you are just getting the cheap part. I don't think you would be harmed if you passed on this. Just look for som e sales and buy a mini lathe and the extension bed. Get a set of HSS tools from Harbor Freight. Grinder and the Wolverine system too if you want a j ig for sharpening the tools. More expensive, but I think higher quality wh en you are done.
On Saturday, July 25, 2015 at 1:51:34 PM UTC-5, sawdustmaker wrote:

s

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Look at the picture. The nine inches is from center to the way. Many lathes are stating 2x and this isn't a 4.5" wood cutting lathe. The Bowl blank on the lathe and on the floor are much larger. If you make pens, one doesn't need 12". If you make salt/pepper / cups / small 8" bowls you don't need a 16. Only if you run large hundred pound logs do you need something like that.
Martin
On 7/26/2015 7:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

e tools. More expensive, but I think higher quality when you are done.

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Just a few thoughts from a right pondian. Looks decent and not expensive. Definitely underpowered. No provision for outboard turning Good bed length and decent swing. Exposed belting may have probs with flying shavings. Also the exposed belting does pose a more than minor hazard. Plain bearings (note oilers) are something of a downer. If not previously used/abused too greatly, should be ok.
All in all I think it looks a fair purchase and you could probably consider the included items a bonus.
As a matter of interest. The grinder nameplate says 'split phase motor'. What does this mean? I know UK and US electrickery is vastly different but I've never seen this before.
If I came across this in England, I would probably have a pop at it. I use an ancient Union Jubilee with 2hp motor. Wiring modified to spin the motor in reverse, invaluable for fine sanding/finishing. http://www.lathes.co.uk/harrisonwood/page2.html
I think that if you are interest, you should have a go. You'll not be wasting your money.
Just my 2P's worth.
Nick, England (not old nick and not New England)
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A split-phase motor is a single phase motor with a starting winding. Almost invariably they also have a starting capacitor, and are usually called capacitor start motors.
There are split-phase motors without starting caps, but they don't have very good starting torque, so you usually only see them in low power applications.
John
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"Nick" wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------- "John McCoy" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- Sorry but split phase motors NEVER have capacitors.
They depend on the phase shift between rotor and stator to develop a limited amout of starting torque when starting.
Typical split phase applications would be running cooling fans which require only limited amounts of starting torque.
Single phase motors can be equipped with a starting capacitor which switches out when the rotor reaches operating RPM. They are known as cap start motors.
These motors are used for high starting torque applications and are more expensive than split phase motors of the same size.
There are also motors known as cap start, cap run motors.
Cap start, cap run motors allow the motor designer to squeeze more HP from a given frame size.
Typical applications would include a table saw where a 2 HP, 3450 RPM, 56 frame, 240 V will just fit into a 10" contractor's saw.
This shoe horning of a large frame in a small space uses cap start, cap run technology.
Lew
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I suggest you get out your electrical engineering textbook. What you posted is incorrect.
John
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"John McCoy" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------
"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------- "John McCoy" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------- Perhaps you would care to share with the us your current source, their price and availability of a split phrase motor that is equipped with a capacitor.
Lew
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All capactitor start motors are split-phase motors.
Since you didn't follow my suggestion to go look up what a split-phase motor is, allow me to elucidate:
A split-phase motor is a single phase AC induction motor with a starting winding.
It doesn't make a difference if you put a capacitor in series with the starting winding or not, it's still a split-phase motor.
By convention we call the ones with a capacitor "capacitor start", and by implication if we don't call it capacitor start then it's resistance-start (or reactance-start, same thing to all intents and purposes).
The alternative to a split-phase motor is a shaded-pole motor, which does not have a starting winding.
John
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"John McCoy" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------
"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------- "John McCoy" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------- "Lew Hodgett" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- "John McCoy" wrote:

--------------------------------------------------------------- So the question still stands.
Where do you buy a split phase motor equipped with a capacitor?
Lew
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net says...

You mean besides Grainger, McMaster, Grizzly, and Harbor Freight?

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Motor repair place! Often they get the old ones... for the taking and fixing.
Martin
On 7/31/2015 5:51 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

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