Latest project pics -- doll cradle

http://home.earthlink.net/~nateperkins1/Woodworking/projects/dollcradle.htm
This one was a lot of fun to make.
Cheers, Nate
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Nate,
Wonderful job! I've been practicing hand-cut through dovetails for the last month or so - maybe cut about 15 practice corners so far - and yours look awesome. The choice of wood was great and the inlay came out very nicely.
Thanks for sharing,
Mike

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On Mon, 20 Sep 2004 00:47:05 GMT, "Mike in Mystic"

Nate, absolutely gorgeous. Well done!
One tip: Next time, perfection can be had by scribing the baseline for the dovies with a pencil. It's erasable so it doesn't show in the final project, inside or out.
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Aren't scribe lines a symbol of the hand cut nature of the dovetails?
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On 20 Sep 2004 11:27:29 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) calmly ranted:

No, that's an excuse for poor craftsmanship when someone says that.
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...

Hi Larry,
Are you joking here or serious? I, too, thought that it was appropriate to leave the scribes visible as a mark that the piece was handmade. The lines are there intentionally -- otherwise I would have scribed them lighter or sanded them out.
Hmm, well I gotta make two more for a couple of nieces so maybe I'll try a different approach on the next one.
Cheers, Nate
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No it is not sloppy workmanship. There are many examples of well crafted pieces with the scribe lines present. The general rule is either leave all of them or remove (plane off) all of them. Check point number 3 (first product photo) in the link below. This is work from a well known and respected craftsman.
http://www.chbecksvoort.com/tbeckdiff.html
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Alan Bierbaum

Web Site: http://www.calanb.com
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On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 09:56:08 -0600, "Alan Bierbaum"

Tacky. Frank Klausz, whom I respect more, uses pencil and removes all marks prior to finishing. He was taught Old-World style.
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Nice to see that you admitted to opinion, not fact. There are two schools of thought (or more). I also like Frank's work; however leaving scribe marks on hand cut dovetails is an accepted method by many fine craftsmen.
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Alan Bierbaum

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On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 11:41:24 -0600, "Alan Bierbaum"
Jewelcome.

Cites?
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On 21 Sep 2004 07:30:14 -0700, n snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Nate Perkins) calmly ranted:

I feel that the marks detract from an otherwise gorgeous piece.
I feel that any self-respecting craftsman would have removed marks like that, generally with his plane when he trued up the dovies. My take is that it's kinda tacky, but it's not too late to plane, scrape, or sand them out. Slight variations in the dovetail width or angles usually indicate a Real Dovie(tm) vs. a machined dovie. ;)
I believe the original use of scribe marks to define handcut dovetails was either 1) an excuse by a lazy woodworker who didn't want to take the time to clean up after himself or 2) an attempt by unscrupulous salespeople to sell newer goods as antiques to make more money for themselves. Neither is good in my eyes.

I would hope so. You wouldn't intentionally leave crossgrain sandpaper marks, scratches or planer marks, would you?
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Thanks, Mike :-)
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