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On 6/16/2013 1:09 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Reread all of what I said, typically the ones you buy are not of high quality and easily bend. The ones you refer to on steel cabinet doors are normally welded in place so that there is no give where attached and are a better quality hinge that you normally find at a ww store or the big box. FWIW the piano hinges used on both of the 45" doors on the spool cabinet that the builder used are still firmly fixed with all 44 screws on each side but there is wiggle on both sides. As a result one side sags more than the other. Had the builder used 3 pair of Euro style hinges for about the "same price" there would have been no play/wiggle and any sag that may develop over the years, for what ever reason, could be easily adjusted out. I am paying $1.28 for each Euro style hinge and they come with a life time warranty.
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On 6/16/2013 1:09 PM, woodchucker wrote:

OK, a picture is worth a thousand words.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/9061338634/
If you will notice, the brand new piano hinge pictured, has gaps between the "ears" on each side of the hinge. Because of this gap the "ears" that are actually supporting all of the weight are going to wear more quickly and or the ones carrying the weight will distort until some of the other ears begin to engage and help carry the load. The the gap closes, the door settles/sags.
When used in a horizontal position the ill fitting halves do not matter because most of the load is then placed on the hinge pin vs. the ear tops and bottoms when used vertically.
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On 6/16/2013 3:54 PM, Leon wrote:

I see your point, but not all piano hinges are made equally. These are very high in quality by comparision to what you would get in HD. http://imgur.com/frcIm3K
I got them from a cabinet shop going out of business. I like the undrilled ones, as I can do anything I want with them.
The down side to your euro hinge is that you are always in 3/4 or thicker stock, whereas with the piano hinge it's possible to use 1/2 or thicker. But I understand.
--
Jeff

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On 6/16/2013 3:54 PM, Leon wrote:

I see your point, but not all piano hinges are made equally. These are very high in quality by comparision to what you would get in HD. http://imgur.com/frcIm3K
I got them from a cabinet shop going out of business. I like the undrilled ones, as I can do anything I want with them.
The down side to your euro hinge is that you are always in 3/4 or thicker stock, whereas with the piano hinge it's possible to use 1/2 or thicker. But I understand.
--
Jeff

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Thanks Leon. Perfectly clear from the photo. I bought some solid brass continuous for some window seats a few years back that were very high quality, and the price reflected it. I imagine they would also wear quickly (brass) in the vertical position.
Thanks to all the folks who commented.
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"Roy" wrote in message
OK, I need some help understanding why piano hinges could be a problem due to sag. I'm a hobbyist and have used piano hinges a few times, but never with the hinge in the vertical position.
I recall a couple magazine articles about building your own big roll around storage cabinet that used full length (6-7 feet) piano hinges to open up multiple sets of shelves depicted as having heavy jars of screws, etc. And as I think of it, each of these sets of shelves had a caster supporting the non-hinged side. So I guess I just answered my own question about this piece of shop furniture. But I'd still like to understand how a piano hinge would sag when used for a thread cabinet. ====================================================================================The difference between a regular hinge and a piano hinge is length. That is it.
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Leon wrote:

Gorgeous. As usual.
--
 GW Ross 

 Do not call up that which you cannot 
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 6/9/2013 10:25 AM, G. Ross wrote:

Thank you
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Leon wrote:

Great workmanship! I don't see why the spool cabinet and the bookcase needed to be physically attached, but I suppose one shouldn't argue with the customer bout what they want!
I won't go into detail about what I learned from your photos--but I did.
Thanks for sharing! Bill
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On 6/9/2013 11:54 AM, Bill wrote:

Not sure why you would not see why they would be attached, the spool cabinet would easily topple over when you open the doors.

Thank yoou
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Leon wrote:

No, I thought the spool cabinet should basically be anchored to a wall.

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It is designed to be hung from the wall but the husband thought it would pull the wall down. LOL
It basically sets on top of the front step and both the spool cabinet and step up are attached to the upper back cabinet, back cab attached to lower cab. The upper back cab will be anchored to the wall
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Leon wrote:

Just don't pull the wall down (LOL)!!! : )
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On 6/8/2013 11:47 PM, Leon wrote: ...

...
What's the point of the doors on the sides of the upper? Can't figure out what the client is planning for those tall/skinny spaces???
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On 6/9/2013 12:03 PM, dpb wrote:

This is a lady is a quilter, the top back cabinet will house a portable ironing board, cutting mats and cutting rules.
FWIW the upper cabinet has 4 doors, 2 on the ends and 2 around the corners from the ends, on the front, just beside the spool cabinet. The unit will set in the corner against a wall just inches wider than the cabinet. Therefore I added the front door on the left front as the left side door will probably not ever be used because of the side wall restriction. If the cabinet is ever moved to another location the left side door might possibly be used. And it looks better being symetrical. ;~)
Oh and FWIW, the back upper cabinet is open all the way through, from side to side.
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I have now finished adding the backs and door pulls and the unit is ready for delivery.
I added a couple of pictures showing what most hide, the back side. I started using back face frames on all of my cabinets about 18 months ago and while similar to the front face frames the back face frame joints are rabbet on rabbet reinforced with floating tenon's/Domino's. This rabbet on rabbet joint naturally forms a rebate/recess all the way around the in side back of the face frame that accepts the 1/4" back panels. It makes for a very clean looking back and probably doubles the cabinet's resistance to rack. So far I have built 34 front and back face frames for 17 cabinets in the last 18 months.
The back view
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/9000688447/
And the inside view of the upper back cabinet.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/9001873934/
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Looks nice. I think I would have put on 4 legs on the bottom - maybe half circles cut out of he side feet. Likely it will have feet to keep it from rocking or such.
Martin
On 6/9/2013 6:50 PM, Leon wrote:

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Thank you
I think I would have put on 4 legs on the bottom -

That suggestion was offered but declined by the customer. The wide side legs have another function of hiding from side view the stuff that will be stored on the floor.
Likely it will have

Screw adjustable felt pad feet.

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One thing that I could suggest as an improvement would to put a

Hmm, I wonder is the pro model different. I change the blades form the top, no side door to open. Do you maybe mean the access door to set the clearance of the brake? I did that once and it works for every blade so far.
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On 6/10/2013 1:40 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

side door to open. Do you maybe mean the access door to set the clearance of the brake? I did that once and it works for every blade so far.

I change the blade from the top too but between the end of the arbor, the end that receives the blade and nut, to the plastic swing door that helps contain the dust there is about 1" clearance. I can't put my hand down there to remove or replace the arbor nut without opening that cover door. Not talking external doors.
If yu look at this first picture you will see the cover door in the close position, it is directly above the dust hose. It has a single hinge bolt on the front just to the left, in the picture, of the top of the dust hose.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8635558766/in/photostream/
In this second picture you see the cover door opened at about a 30 degree angle. This is the door that I often forget to close after changing blades. BTW the yellow bolt just behind the arbor is the one I adjust the brake clearance with.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8635558850/in/photostream/
I have resorted to immediately opening the outer motor cover door when I open the dust cover door to remove the blade. This prevents the saw from starting until I close it. When I close it I remember to check the cover door.
On the industrial you have access to the brake adjustment hex bolt by simply removing the throat plate.
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