Latest Project

Page 1 of 3  
The new SawStop is performing well and is extremely smooth. No issues other than I have not yet had a chance to get my stuff back under the right extension table so nothing is where I expect it to be. As I suspected the black color shows all the saw dust, quite a stark change from my old white Jet. One thing that I could suggest as an improvement would to put a switch on the internal dust cover door that has to be swung open to change blades. It is hard for me to remember to close it and sawdust goes everywhere inside when I forget. If the saw motor cover door or the belt access door are left open the saw will not start. I think the same should be true for that dust cover.
Anyway at least one of you thought that I may not be busy, eh Mike? I am on my second paying job since getting the SawStop and have at least 4 projects waiting in line. I am just finishing up on a unique sewing cabinet. The customer wanted an elevated book case with doors and on top of that a short platform to set a 50" tall sewing spool cabinet, which she supplied. I designed and built the lower cabinet and the upper cabinet behind spool cabinet. The unit is about 94" tall..
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8991167821/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8992363858/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8991171141/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8992367050/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8993185484/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Looks great. Good job.
What brand/kind of hinges did you use for the cabinet's bottom doors?
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thank you

I used Blum compact 38N compact Euro style hinges, screw in, 1/2" overlay. I buy these in lots of 50 and have literally used several hundreds of them. Lifetime warranty and this batch cost me $1.28 per hinge. Smaller quantities from my supplier are $1.82, IIRC

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

er

hite

e

lt

on

ts

e

rt

That's a heckuva lot of pegs you've got there. It has a certain medieval quality to it when it's open. They never expect the Spanish Inquisition.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Snip

Remember, I did not build that portion, the customer supplied that.
But yes when I had it laying down on its back side you were instantly reminded of one of those bed of nails when you opened the doors.
I have to think the maker probably used some style of gang boring accessory on his DP. There are in excess of 400 dowels.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, June 9, 2013 9:23:16 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

ory on his DP. There are in excess of 400 dowels.
Actually, it doesn't take too long to drill the holes, using a simple jig. My thread racks have about 250 pegs, angled 15 degrees, so the spools don' t easily slide off. My dowels aren't glued in, either, which makes for ea sy replacement if one breaks. They're 3/16" in diameter, small enough to h old bobbins, also, under the large (same color thread) spool. A neighbor d oes alterations, uses smaller spools, than I. I made her rack, also, a cou ple hundred pegs.... however many fit onto the allotted space. Open front (no doors), wall mounted framed rack, not cabinet type racks.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/9/2013 10:27 AM, Sonny wrote:

thread racks have about 250 pegs, angled 15 degrees, so the spools don't easily slide off. My dowels aren't glued in, either, which makes for easy replacement if one breaks. They're 3/16" in diameter, small enough to hold bobbins, also, under the large (same color thread) spool. A neighbor does alterations, uses smaller spools, than I. I made her rack, also, a couple hundred pegs.... however many fit onto the allotted space. Open front (no doors), wall mounted framed rack, not cabinet type racks.

But how many do you produce?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, June 9, 2013 1:00:37 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

I've made 3 for myself, about 250 pegs total. One for my neighbor, with at least 200 pegs. One for my sister, with about 150 pegs. One each for 2 upholstery school classmates, with about 75 pegs each. All pegs angled.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, June 9, 2013 1:42:28 PM UTC-5, Sonny wrote:

Check that. The boards/shelves of the rack are angled about 15 degrees, onto the frame's sides. The pegs are perpendicular to the boards/shelves. I did use a custom made jig for drilling and spacing the peg holes.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Now think of making hundreds as the company that builds this unit does, think gang boring might ease production effort?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- Which reminds me, what ever happened to the guy from Jersey who was in the specialty drilling machine business?
Name was Joe Argo maybe?
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He still posts here on occasion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/9/2013 4:12 PM, Leon wrote:

Here is the maker of the thread cabinet
http://romwoodworking.com/enclosed-thread-cabinets.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, June 9, 2013 4:12:58 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Well, yes, when they're being mass produced.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do agree that probably with less setup trouble and cost, drilling holes for a hand full of cabinets would best be done with already available tools. But I knew that these particular cabinets were being mass produced. The cabinet appears to be pretty well constructed and the joints are very good but the use of the piano hinges and lack of a decent finish is a little hard on the eyes. The piano hinges used in this orientation is an open invitation for sag, and the doors already have a bit of sag. In anticipation of this I beveled the front and extended the front of the "step up" to help realign the door fronts when returning them to the closed position.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, June 9, 2013 9:31:29 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

for a hand full of cabinets would best be done with already available tool s. But I knew that these particular cabinets were being mass produced. The cabinet appears to be pretty well constructed and the joints are very good but the use of the piano hinges and lack of a decent finish is a little har d on the eyes. The piano hinges used in this orientation is an open invitat ion for sag, and the doors already have a bit of sag. In anticipation of th is I beveled the front and extended the front of the "step up" to help real ign the door fronts when returning them to the closed position.
I did initially noticed that bevel on the lower edges (close-up pic of the bottom), but didn't give it a second thought as to why.
Sometimes, the idea of "bigger is better" is not better. For someone's pe rsonal thread rack, as that, an enclosed cabinet is a piece of furniture, s o I can understand having doors, for looks. For the doors to store spools of thread, also, may be weight-loading the units too much, IMO. When opene d, it becomes a display cabinet, with showy (numerous) spools, and contribu tes very little, if anything, when in actual use for sewing or quilting.
If the doors/hinges are a little weak, the builder sacrificed sturdiness fo r asthetics (for show?). Might be best to eliminate the doors' rack aspect and just have doors with no pegs. That's a heck of a lot of spool storage on the doors. Not even all my pegs have spools on them and quite a few pa irs of pegs have same color spools. Even for hanging on the wall, I made s ure the hanger aspect, of my racks, were strong/secure enough not to pull o ut from the wall.
Another aspect of my rack use: It's not so neat and clean looking. I grab a spool, use it, put it back with end-thread hanging down, so there are en ds of threads hanging from almost every used spool... some end threads hang from the bobbins, also. No doubt those quilters and other like-sewers are more neat, than I am, that way.
As per your observations, I think you're suggesting the cabinets could be d esigned a little better (for sturdiness, at least), a few tweaks here and t here, and still be asthetically nice and presentable. Yep, I'd likely agre e.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
OK, I need some help understanding why piano hinges could be a problem due to sag. I'm a hobbyist and have used piano hinges a few times, but never with the hinge in the vertical position.
I recall a couple magazine articles about building your own big roll around storage cabinet that used full length (6-7 feet) piano hinges to open up multiple sets of shelves depicted as having heavy jars of screws, etc. And as I think of it, each of these sets of shelves had a caster supporting the non-hinged side. So I guess I just answered my own question about this piece of shop furniture. But I'd still like to understand how a piano hinge would sag when used for a thread cabinet.
Thanks for the info.
Roy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Roy wrote:

I don't have the experience to say whether it would sag or not. But I can see that the forces exerted on the hinges, by the open doors of the cabinet, stress it in the worst possible way--particularly the little "feet" that wrap around the rod (please excuse my terminology).
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Piano hinges are designed to be used in a horizontal orientation where the load is placed mostly evenly in the same direction on the hinge pin and along its entire length to maintain alignment. Used vertically that load is transferred unevenly along its length. Add to that most piano hinges are relatively inexpensive for their size and are not typically of a high quality, they are easily bent out of shape.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/16/2013 3:34 AM, Leon wrote:

Not sure I understand that. Piano hinges have been used to hold heavy tool doors on work cabinets for a long time. I would think they actually reduce sag since there are more points of contact. While not as robust as a regular door hinge you would not be able to fit a door hin in this instance. So I'm not so sure I think they lead to sag.. I think it depends on what the load is, and how it's used. I think having a slight rebate for the hinge helps avoid issues.
--
Jeff who has to work today. No time to play in the shop.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.