Large wall of drawers: How to build frame/carcass?

Page 2 of 2  
On Wed, 9 Dec 2009 07:55:25 -0800 (PST), Kevin

Large drawers can be a problem, and will add a lot of weight in your attic. You might take a look how the Shakers made built-ins. One design in Lexington KY has an attic filled with drawers under a skylight--I saw it in person and it's wonderful.
From a practical standpoint, I prefer open shelves and Rubbermaid lidded plastic totes to keep out moisture/insects.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Again, thanks for all of the thoughtful responses! Great tips Swingman, I will certainly apply those. After this discussion, I think I will reduce the size of the box of drawers so that overloading the floor joists is not an issue. Instead, I think I will build several smaller units around the space, including some in the knee wall that runs along two sides (and yes, dealing with any load- supporting-knee-wall issues, if they arise!).
Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Again, thanks for all of the thoughtful responses! Great tips Swingman, I will certainly apply those. After this discussion, I think I will reduce the size of the box of drawers so that overloading the floor joists is not an issue. Instead, I think I will build several smaller units around the space, including some in the knee wall that runs along two sides (and yes, dealing with any load- supporting-knee-wall issues, if they arise!).
Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just a comment about Amazon.
I am working on a project that needed some books by certain authors. No subsitutes would work. I looked them up everywhere and all the books except one were only available used. And one book only became available the third time I looked. I ordered them last week. The last one arrived today. I had to pay $4 shipping for each one. But I got them in. I am all set.
Also, the reviews on amazon were very good to help determine if these books would work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 10 Dec 2009 16:27:09 -0500, the infamous "Lee Michaels"

Yeah, they have helped me previously, too. I also go to www.ISBN.nu for books. They and www.ABEBOOKS.com sometimes have authors I don't find in abundance (or cheap enough ;) on Amazone or eBay. And I just _love_ buying a once-read book for a tenth of the cover price. I don't mind spending a penny plus $3.99 shipping for the occasional NEW book from Amazon, either. ;)
-- To know what you prefer instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive. -- Robert Louis Stevenson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fantatstic tips! I like the jig Swingman, I will certainly whip up one of these once I get my slides. Which leads me to my next question: Which side-mount, full-extension, 100 lbs+-rated slides do folks like? My searching has led me to many brands (KV, Accuride, Blum) but was wondering if anyone had a favorite. And, thanks again!
Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kevin wrote:

When it comes to side mount, I've always had excellent results with KV. Excellent product at a good price.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
With regards to side-mount slides, I've noticed that many slides can be used with a maximum drawer width of 24". (I understand that the wider the drawer, the more prone it is to racking). I had originally planned to build some drawers that were about 36" wide, 24" deep, and 10" high, and the fact that they are wider than they are deep seems to put them in the category of "lateral file drawers". There are "lateral file drawer" slides available (strong and expensive) but these seem to be overkill since my drawers will not be carrying 100s of lbs of paper, and they also don't have the extreme aspect ratio (very wide and very shallow) that a typical lateral file drawer has. Has anyone built drawers of the size I am considering and used standard side-mount drawer slides (such as the KV 8500 series)?
As always, thanks!
Kevin
P.S. Lew, your solution using Rubbermaid bins is the one I have been using so far (GMTA!). The "attic" as I call it is a fairly nice living space, so I'm hoping to improve the looks of my storage by installing drawers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kevin wrote:

...
Actually, I've done so (in strict violation of manufacturers' instructions as you note so I'm sure there will be a number of posters just waiting to pounce given the outrage over simply using a 130V light bulb... :( but, I'll venture forth anyway :) ) -- I've done two things:
First, simply ignored the prohibition and went ahead. No serious problems experienced up to about the 36" width, again, in a fairly lightly loaded application (sweaters, that sort of thing). This does assume what I'd call the "rational user"; I'd not try it in commercial work or in a rental, for example. IOW, that was for own use where know the limitations.
Alternatively, in a set of fairly heavily loaded drawers in a storage area under a set of stairs I mounted one of the same slides flatwise on the bottom of the drawer as a guide. It's a little picky getting it aligned "just right" but it worked as intended. Those drawers were almost 48". They were adequate enough that I'd have no trouble doing that on "boughten work".
That was ages ago before the advent of online suppliers that are so easy to get specialty parts as are these days; probably one could order in some of the wood/plastic "t-bar" center alignment kits to serve the purpose much more cheaply. Then again, there's always the homemade sliding dovetail guide that would work since it doesn't need to carry the load at all but serve as alignment it can be fairly loose and still control the wracking that would cause the slides themselves to bind.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

This is an excellent method to overcome the limitation Kevin is concerned about, and one I've used with extra wide drawers. Although the drawer pictured shown below is much smaller, and the middle, shop made dovetail runner was the only runner, the method is exactly the same:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/DrawerOvl.jpg
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
scrawled the following:

OhmyCrom! You're probably one of those types who pulls the tags off pillows and mattresses, too, aren't you? Mercy me!
--snip of the rest of a good post--
--
Don't forget the 7 P's:
Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss-Poor Performance
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Dec 2009 10:02:33 -0800 (PST), the infamous Kevin

They are, Kevin. The house I moved into has a 43" wide wooden chest of drawers without slides and they rack terribly. I have to rewax them 3 times a year or they stick badly when one drawer-side or the other binds on the frame. That same racking tends to tear up slides.

The weight rating on slides is the maximum they will carry and still give you the rated number of openings/closings the mfgr states, usually 50,000-75,000 cycles. With the exception of our favorite drawers, most drawers won't be subject to that much use, so overloading is tolerated much of the time.

You might not use that much weight in them now, but later, it'll find its way in there. (Murphy sez so.) Which means that sooner or later, perhaps not until the next owner, the slides will fail and you'll have to upgrade. Until then, though, it'll work just fine.
I haven't built any really wide drawers, but those I've seen have always had a central stiffener, so build the bottom like a raised-panel door, with stiffer bottom and smaller panels.

5 nice thing about Rubbermaid bins: 1) everything stays dust-free in them. 2) they're lightweight for portability. 3) because they're portable, they go where the removed contents to, so it's easier to put said contents back in them. Things don't get lost nearly as easily. 4) it's quicker and cheaper to make storage this way. 5) contents are easily visible.
The only downside is that you might not find exact-size/shape replacement "drawers" years later.
--
Don't forget the 7 P's:
Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss-Poor Performance
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.