Lapping? sharpening stones...


Hi, All,
In my 2nd shop, just getting filled out with stuff, I have some oil stones for plane blades, chisels. They have gotten pretty worn and some gouges. Is there a way to remove the dips and gouges more agressively than with sand paper? Like a brick, or cement block??? Then I can follow up with 120 grit for a final flatening. I was looking at the patio steps....., but with single digit temps, I decided to see if someone had been here before.
Thanks for any help.
Regards,
Rich.....
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I think, you can use abrasive drywall screen, if you can secure it flat. I used it and Norton A/O after, and it worked but these were old Carborundum and Craftsman stones made of silicon carbide. You might be luckier if they are Arkansas or A/O. I learned about it in this ng too...
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I have gotten good results with the products at: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p3017&cat=1,43072 The 90 grit is very aggressive.
You may also want to check out water stones. The kit here gets you all you need. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p2970&cat=1,43072,45936
Paul.
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You might need to wait for spring for this one to work.
Build a simple 4 sided box that is open on the top and bottom. Make it large enough to hold the stones with room to spare. Attach a rope to the box and tie to the back of a tricycle. Install stones. Get grandkid, neighbor kid, or other small operator for the tricycle. Have them drive round and round on the driveway. If you can find a large warehouse, the weather becomes less important. You can wet the drive way for more efficient grinding. Inspect stones about every 10 minutes, it is surprising how fast this process goes.
You and friends can use lawn chairs to supervise this quality time with grandkids. Beer is optional. Maybe don't tell grandma exactly what you are doing.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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LOL exactly, because it's hard work otherwise!
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I seem to recall a similar tip in an old FWW magazine. The author used a special knot that typesetters use, instead of building a box. And they used the concrete floor in the basement.
But I like Dan's verison better. :-)
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"rich"

These are what I use. http://www.dmtsharp.com/products/duosharp.htm
They work great and fast. Dave
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What type of stones, what are they made of? Silicon carbide is the toughest material of all (and worst, slowest sharpening as a stone) beyond aluminum oxide, Arkansas 99.9% silica, or any waterstone.
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Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
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Carbon.
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Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Thanks for the ideas! I like the tricycle and box best, but I ordered the stuff from Leevalley, the glass and powder. I think that 90 grit may do the trick.
Regards, Rich.....
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You could try using the sandpaper used ona drum floor sander. If you have a hardware store near by or a rental place that has a floor sander they will sell special sheets of truely obscene grit heavy-weight paper. The middle grit is probably something like 60-grit paper. I think one "sheet" is a buck and change.
-Steve

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