Lap joint on end of 2x4?

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On 4/27/2010 9:58 PM, Winston wrote:

Thank you. I can't really tell how much is protected. If ugly will do the job, then that stick should last forever!
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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On 4/27/2010 9:17 PM, Morris Dovey wrote:

Exactly.
That was one of the very few *good* looking pieces that I selected out of the HD stack.
Oh Well. It just has to work structurally.
Thanks.
--Winston
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On 4/27/2010 9:26 PM, Winston wrote:

Just put it up on flickr--an account is free.

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On Tue, 27 Apr 2010 18:26:54 -0700, the infamous Winston

Is it sprayed on? Now you know why you don't buy wood at Homey's Despot.
Send the pic! You have my addy.
-- Losing faith in humanity, one person at a time.
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On Tue, 27 Apr 2010 01:43:14 -0400, the infamous "J. Clarke"

YOU, sir, have obviously never cut a pressure treated piece of lumber in half. The core is never, in my experience, fully treated. Copper solutions only penetrate about 1/4", as discussed above.
That's why I keep 2 colors of dye/preservative in my truck. I have to daub it on the cut ends of PT lumber when I'm done so it matches and is protected from bugs and moisture. http://fwd4.me/EMu brown (most used) and http://fwd4.me/EMy (green) are what I've found locally.

I've been using the epoxy coated deck screws, but find that upon removal, half the epoxy is rubbed off. I'm in the process of converting my stock to galv once again. I want my hard work to outlast me. Square drive is definitely the best answer, too, with combo (pozi and square) the next best thing. TORX is quite good, as well, but square is my fave.
-- Losing faith in humanity, one person at a time.
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On 4/27/2010 6:51 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

(...)
So, I learned *two* things this week. They are mutually contradictory, but I stand by my count.
:)
Larry, can I use regular wood glue to bond inner fibers of PT doug fir? Would epoxy work better? Some other adhesive perhaps?

Yup, I have a can of 'environmentally friendly' sealant for cut ends. It seems to work because I saw no deterioration in some diagonally cut 4 x 4 s that lived in the sun and rain for a decade.
(...)

Ya got that right! I tested my first square drive fasteners in lumber a couple days ago. Absolutely *no* cam-out, even with a 2-1/2" long screw into dry wood. Solid, Jackson.
--
Discovered an interesting thing (parenthetically speaking).
The same screws are sold in entirely different ways per market.
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Winston wrote:

Butting in, any glue will glue but some glue better. PVA (white glue) is no good around water. Aliphatic ("yellow glue") may or not be OK...type one isn't good around water; type 2 is "water resisant" which should be fine; type 3 is waterproof.
Also water proof are epoxy, Resorcinol, and urea-formaldehyde glues such as Weldwood Plastic Resin. All are overkill for your project IMO.
Epoxy is good for joining less than good joints when it is thickened with something like Cab-o-Sil.
--

dadiOH
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Would that happen to be why the various Titebonds are named the way they are?
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On 4/27/2010 8:57 AM, dadiOH wrote:

I will ask for 'type 3 aliphatic glue', yes?
--Winston
--

Harley was venal, arrogant, despicable and a psychologist.
He was the second most redundant man I ever talked to.
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Winston wrote:

That or type 2. Not likely a clerk will know what you want if you ask for aliphatic glue though. The "type" thing is (I think) what Titebond calls them, get it or just read the label on other brands.
--

dadiOH
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On 4/27/2010 10:50 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Gotcha. Waterproof wood glue and circ saw blades.
Thanks!
--Winston
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RE: Subject
A circular saw and a chisel followed by a flat bastard file gets the joint made.
Assemble with some laminating epoxy thickened with micro-balloons and clamp lightly to hold while epoxy "kicks".
Enjoy a cold beer while observing your craftsmanship and watching epoxy kick.
Prepare for next project.
Lew
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On 4/27/2010 3:38 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

OK. Thanks Lew.
--Winston
--

Harley was venal, arrogant, despicable and a psychologist.
He was the second most redundant man I ever talked to.
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On 4/27/2010 9:30 AM, Winston wrote:

Take this to the bank: use a "construction adhesive" that is formulated for pressure treated wood.
One that immediately comes to mind, and should be easy to find at the BORG, is "Liquid Nails - Subfloor".
Simply put, disregard anything else you read on this issue in this thread about gluing with other types of woodworking glues ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
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On 4/27/2010 10:03 AM, Swingman wrote:

Cool! Thanks!
Liquid Nails for Subflooring Circ Saw blades Chisel
--Winston
--

Harley was venal, arrogant, despicable and a psychologist.
He was the second most redundant man I ever talked to.
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On Tue, 27 Apr 2010 12:03:17 -0500, the infamous Swingman

"Goes on wet, comes up sticky!"

What he said, but I still prefer galvanized glue for the PT crap.
-- Losing faith in humanity, one person at a time.
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On Tue, 27 Apr 2010 07:30:31 -0700, the infamous Winston

Galvanized bolts work better unless you let the wood dry really well first, and that means it'll warp before you get it up. :(
What's this for, again?

What's environmentally friendly about mold/mildewcide and termiticide, I wonder?

That's the way things should work.

Damn, those are CHEAP! I pay $20+ for those here, $25 for the normal 3-1/2-inchers, GripRITEs from Taiwan. Pozi heads, like yours. Galv and other high-tech coatings are higher, too.

Yeah, that's why I use an impact driver exclusively, and square or pozi heads almost exclusively.
-- Losing faith in humanity, one person at a time.
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On 4/27/2010 6:07 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

(...)
Two fence gates. Each are about 44" wide by 60" tall, overall. The frame will be somewhat shorter.

Dunno. Stuff works apparently. That's good enough for me.

I liiike.
--Winston
--

Harley was venal, arrogant, despicable and a psychologist.
He was the second most redundant man I ever talked to.
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Winston wrote:

If I'm reading your intent correctly, the corner would be grain at 90-deg angles. Such a cross-grain joint will fail shortly even w/o the exposure to weather. Forget the glue; if anything, a flexible glue _might_ help serve as a moisture barrier similar to a caulk. The abutted faces will be a moisture wicking point.
As for cutting them, I make the shoulder cut w/ the circular saw and then use the bow saw (rip blade) to cut the length. Some practice and can do that as clean or cleaner than any other way and as quickly as well.
--
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On 4/27/2010 6:59 AM, dpb wrote:

Yes.
Even with screws through the facing boards and through the lap joints? I had no idea doug fir was that weak. I shall have to rethink this.
Perhaps I should weld up a steel box tube frame and use tek screws to hold the facing boards to the front. That'd work but I suspect it would have to be powder coated. This woodworking stuff is more complicated than I thought it would be!

I can't even place a proper axial cut with a band saw!
As you say above, it would all fall apart quickly anyway.
This is educational. Thanks for your thoughts.
--Winston
--

Harley was venal, arrogant, despicable and a psychologist.
He was the second most redundant man I ever talked to.
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