Lap joint on end of 2x4?

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On 4/26/2010 10:59 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote: (...)

My mill can cut aluminum straighter than I can cut scrap.
:)
--Winston
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You shouldn't really have to cut anything "straight".
The 2 x 4's for the base are already cut straight, you just have to cut them to length.
The same goes for anything that you'll be using for the upper frame. Any kind of scraps that can be laid out in a square will work, including more 2 x 4's.
I really believe that you are over thinking this fairly simple project.
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On 4/26/2010 4:39 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
(...)

You are absolutely correct.
It turned out that I only *really* needed to constrain one direction of one axis. So I clamped a piece of scrap aluminum square on top of my 2x4 as a fence and routed my step. It turned out much nicer than I thought it would and requires no cleanup. That'll do.
Thanks for your thoughts on this.
--Winston
--

Harley was venal, arrogant, despicable and a psychologist.
He was the second most redundant man I ever talked to.
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On 4/26/2010 3:07 PM, Winston wrote:

Oooooh! Ok - now I can be my usual trouble-making self...
Why not do your lap joints like this:
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/LLJ /
with something like this:
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/JBot /
:)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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On 4/26/2010 1:38 PM, Morris Dovey wrote:

Very nice, Morris!
--Winston
--

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<snip>

Braggart! <GD&R> I wish I had your abilities! Tom
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On 4/28/2010 10:16 AM, Tom B wrote:

It's not much a matter of abilities - I really wanted an accurate joinery machine to compensate for my _lack_ of abilities.
It was a matter of making drawings (a lot of drawings) until I had a design that, if I could build it, would be inexpensive and do what I wanted. That took a while...
One of the things that no one seems to notice is that there are relatively few critical dimensions in the wooden parts. :)
Even so, by the time I was done I'd made all of the wooden parts _at_ _least_ three times before I had 'em right...
The motors and electronics, and the controller software were all off the shelf - the results of _other_ peoples' abilities.
The only thing I can really brag about is sticking with the project until it was done (I _almost_ didn't).
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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On 4/28/2010 8:49 AM, Morris Dovey wrote:
(...)

http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/JBot /
I didn't see a BOM, dimensioned drawings and assembly /setup instructions for your JBot, Morris.
You are selling the CD with all this on it for $24.95, yes? A 'wood parts' kit for $129.95? Full mechanicals kit, minus the motors and electronics for $449.95?
Link? <G>
--Winston <-- Subtle, very subtle
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On 4/28/2010 11:09 AM, Winston wrote:

Drawings were posted to ABPW as soon as the design was finalized, and photos were posted to my web site as each part was made and installed. What you see on the web site today are just a few of those photos.

At one time I'd entertained the notion of selling the machines RTA, but was put to rights about issues like liability and warranty requirements by the folks here. I decided that it was in my best interest, and in some customers' best interests, to not sell whirly-sharp machines.
If you prefer to buy one, there are a number of similarly-sized, if somewhat less capable, machines on the market. Check at Sears or Rockler.
I think there are plans (and probably complete kits) available from some of the folks over on http://www.cnczone.com
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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On 4/28/2010 9:57 AM, Morris Dovey wrote:
(...)

OK, Thanks Morris!
--Winston
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Skilsaw (or equivalent), cut across the 2x4 at the proper distance from the end, then use the Neander approach -- wide wood chisel and a hammer to 'split' in from the end.
*WAY* less dust than the router will throw up.
Of course, you've got to be able to chisel a flat surface. for the lap.
To reduce the effort of Neandering, do a -series- of parallel custs with the Skilsaw, then break the 'fingers' off, and clean up with the chisel.
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On 4/26/2010 1:48 PM, Robert Bonomi wrote:
(...)

Yes. Please see my forth sentence.

Hi, Robert.
I may revisit this approach, particularly if I can find a circular saw blade with a very wide kerf (1/4" or wider?). My first attempt failed because I left way too much room between cuts, as mentioned by other groupers.
My chisel-fu is not going to be up to your standard, so it may pay me to continue to let the router create the flat surfaces I require. That will be sufficient for the few pieces I need.
Thanks!
--Winston
--

Harley was venal, arrogant, despicable and a psychologist.
He was the second most redundant man I ever talked to.
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I suppose you could put two blades on the saw. *grin* an actual dado set, "wobble" or otherwise, is definitely not a good idea,

BTW, there's nothing that says you have to leave _any_ space between the cuts -- you can take it all off with the saw blade. "Break it off, and clean up with a chisel and/or rasp" just tends to be easier/faster, particularly, when you're going 'along' the grain.

I'll merely point out that you don't _need_ "flat" surfaces, just that the two surfaces to be joined 'match". This -is- easier to do, with a bit of 'lay them to together and see where they bind'.
I'm not disparaging the way you're currently doing it -- if it works _for_you_ that's all that matters. <grin>
When the opportunity presents itself, it is always worthwhile experimenting with alternative approaches -- who knows, one of them *may* fit you better than the way you have been doing it. Of course, it may not, but you're never going to know until you try it.
One other alternative to consider, *IF* you've got the space to stand the 2x4 _on_end_, and support it stably, is to use a "back saw" (hand saw with a reinforced spine on the blade) to cut down the middle of the 2x4s, and then lay them down and cut off one of the 'sides', either with the back saw, or a power saw. This +does+ call for some skill with the back saw, to hold it vertical as you get the cut started.
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On 4/26/2010 6:14 PM, Robert Bonomi wrote:

We agree. 'Power tool racing' is for braver souls than me.

I grok.

I was hoping to take advantage of the raw wood in flat contact by gluing the corner laps together for added rigidity. Flatter would be better for that use, yes?

'Perfect' is the enemy of 'good enough'. I am not building a piano, I am building a fence gate. :)

I agree.

I'm not interested in developing the technique necessary to make a proper cut under these circumstances. That sounds like a lot of work and frustration. I will let Mr. Router do that for now.
I appreciate your thoughts on this.
Thanks!
--Winston
--

Harley was venal, arrogant, despicable and a psychologist.
He was the second most redundant man I ever talked to.
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On 4/26/2010 9:04 PM, Winston wrote:

Consider a "glue" that can be used with pressure treated wood, and be aware that a lap joint is one joint, particularly in this application, that, in addition to being "glued", needs to be either pinned or screwed together.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
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On 4/26/2010 7:14 PM, Swingman wrote:

Whups. I guessed that the chemical treatment penetration would be shallow enough that the core would remain reasonably unaffected. I was thinking on the order of say 1/4" depth max. I will have to check into this. Thanks for the heads up.

Yup. I bought a couple boxes of chemical resistant square drive fasteners from a local 'pro' lumber shop. I figured the shorter fasteners for the lap corners and the longer fasteners to attach the fence boards to the frame. Lag bolts for the hinges.
--Winston
--

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He was the second most redundant man I ever talked to.
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On 4/27/2010 12:36 AM, Winston wrote:

The whole point of pressure treatment is that it goes all the way through.

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So, when you cut off a piece of pressure treated lumber, and only the first 1/4" or so is brown and the rest looks like regular wood (a little darker) what's the difference between the brown and the yellowish center?
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On 4/27/2010 4:18 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Crappy treatment.
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On 27 Apr 2010 08:18:03 GMT, the infamous Puckdropper

Treating. The untreated center is yellowish. ;)
-- Losing faith in humanity, one person at a time.
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