Laguna vs MiniMax, a persion observation.

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"Enoch Root" wrote in message

The boy is indeed amazing ... pointy sticks and all.
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On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 01:50:13 GMT, "Leon"

<snip>
I too made the same comparisons yesterday at the show, and came to much the same conclusions. The Laguna's "shortcomings", as described by the Minimax folks are just not that big a deal. I didn't see any problem with the Laguna guide bar bar rigidity or strength, and brake access on the Laguna (panned by the Minimax rep) was to me a non issue.
One aspect of the Minimax that may be worth noting is the tires - they mentioned that a "T" cross section is used that drops into a groove to maintain alignment. They claim no need to glue the tires. Laguna responded by claiming the Minimax tires are "plastic", while theirs are rubber. If the "plastic " is polyurethane, it will probably outlast rubber many times over (polyurethane is what's used for most forklift and amusement ride wheels, specifically for long life in terribly abusive conditions).
I'm not quite ready to commit yet to the purchase, but Laguna will probably end up getting my business when the time comes.
Cliff
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Exactly. I believe both saws to be over built anyway. Both saws come with motors producing more than 4.5hp and 4 years ago 2hp was plenty. As for the stronger set up for the guide bar on the MiniMax I wonder what advantage it "really" has over the Laguna because it is bolted up to the same upper cabinet that the Laguna bar is mounted to. Basically both are mounted to probably the same strength upper cabinet. That is the part that will flex first. I never saw the 5mm thick steel on the MiniMax , in fact nothing close to 1/4" thick. Regardless, if the guide bar has anything to do with cut quality the MiniMax came in second to the Laguna.

I pondered the replaceable tire also and have decided that this is a non issue. MiniMax indicated to me in Austin that their tire should last about 7 years in a production shop setting when using 1/2" and smaller blades. Perhaps never with larger blades and not used all day long. Something else to consider concerning the tire that do not glue down. It was mentioned in another post that if the wheel spins too fast a tire could expand and lift if the spee was too great. They were mentioning a blade speed of some where in the 2200 fpm range. I read on the Laguna forum that the 16HD blade speed is around 4800 fpm IIRC. Seems to me the tire will maintain shape better if it is glued down.

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On Mon, 03 Apr 2006 19:31:54 GMT, "Leon"

<snip>
I was a bit amused at the Minimax comments about the cabinet structure and "triple beam" resistance to flexing. As you noted, both machines appear to be built well enough that you'd need to measure very carefully to detect any flex in the upper structure.
I forgot to mention in the earlier post that I too got the sample 4"x7" resaw cutoff from the Laguna guy - paper thin (<1/64") walnut, uniform top to bottom and lengthwise, and very impressive.

<snip>
If I've done the math correctly, 2200fpm and a 16" wheel translates to just under 44rpm; I have a hard time believing a tire is going to start lifting at that point or even at a hundred rpm (4800 is probably somewhere around there). Like most of the other nit pick arguments, it's probably not much of an issue...
Cliff
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cdo wrote:

C = pi * d = 3.14 * 16 = 50.24 inches = 4.19 ft
angular speed = linear speed / C = 2200 fpm / 4.19 ft = 525 rpm
You appear to have forgotten to convert to feet.
Chris
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On Mon, 03 Apr 2006 15:08:25 -0600, Chris Friesen

Ahhh - you're right; thanks for the correction.
Even at ~500rpm I can't see the tires lifting though...
Cliff
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Hell, it's less than 10 revolutions per second. I wouldn't consider that fast at all.
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Upscale wrote:

You don't want high speed. High speed means more friction and heat is The Enemy. What you want are well trued wheels with the more inertia the better, good guides, proper tension, enough horsepower so that the saw doesn't bog down, the right feed rate AND the right blade for the specific type of cutting.
Not sure, unless you've got a catapillar type power feeder set too high, why you need more than a couple of horsepower. Four and a half or five horsepower seems to be major overkill. Perhaps their following the US auto maker's lead - foolishly.
charlie b
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On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 01:50:13 GMT, "Leon"
Hey Leon,

I didn't notice that.

I've beat on my ceramic guides, no problems.

Sure, I drag my saw around the shop like a cavewoman :)

Think my Laguna is pretty limited here too...
<snip>

Excellent.
Have to tell you about what one of the Laguna guys did at the show I attended in Oct...some guy brought in a slice of a tree, looked like fir, 14" diameter and pretty much round, the Laguna guy figures he'll resaw a slice off freehand...had to stick around and watch, sure enough the blade grabbed and jammed, didn't break but got severly kinked. No digits lost but...what a moroon....
-------------------- Steve Jensen Abbotsford B.C. snipped-for-privacy@canada.mortise.com chopping out the mortise. BBS'ing since 1982 at 300 bps. Surfing along at 19200 bps since 95. WW'ing since 1985 LV Cust #4114
Nothing catchy to say, well maybe..... WAKE UP - There are no GODs you fools!
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