Kreg Pocket Hole Jig Recommendation

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Hi everybody, I'm looking for a recommendation on a good starting pocket hole jig kit. I've looked up the different models that Kreg offers, but I'm not sure how much I'd need to get started.
The smallest kit (for around $50) looks pretty bare - is there enough here to start off with, and is it upgradeable?
The next size kit (around $80) looks like it's got everything you'd need to get started - any reason why this would not be a good place to start?
The master kit gets pretty pricey - is it really worth spending that much?
Any opinions/thoughts would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Mike
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Mike,
We have been using the $50.00 kit for a year now and will eventually upgrade to the master kit. The $50.00 kit has been great.
cm
www.vintagetrailersforsale.com

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Ok.. I don't know which kits you are talking about.. But I think the best one is this: http://www.kregtool.com/products/pht/product.php?PRODUCT_IDf The "pocket jig" is kind of a PITA to use. The jig shown lets you put your face frame pieces in vertically and go, no fuss, and very fast.
Mike wrote:

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I assume you meant the Rocket jig. Yes, it is a bit of a pain if you're doing a lot of holes but I have built a lot of things with it. I'm about to buy this http://www.kregtool.com/products/pht/product.php?PRODUCT_ID  . It is a bit higher priced but has the features to make it worth it. I also have the mini jig. Quite handy for odd spots.

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You will like it. I have had it since last summer and more than anything I like the "clutch" type grip the clamp has. When using construction grade materials and the thickness varies the jig will automatically compensate with out having to readjust clamping pressure.
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I have a adjustable dual type that clamp down as well as a single. The Dual one is made of aluminum and the single is plastic with a metal insert. They togather were about $50. USD I think I got them at western tool I may be wrong about the store since they were actually gifts but I am sure that is where she got them. I do remember the price tag though shared bank accounts show things.. :)
Al

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I have the Rocket kit (usually about $50) and it's definitely enough to start with. If you plan to use primarily pocket-hole construction for everything you build, you might want to think about one of the better kits, but the Rocket is definitely a great introduction, and in my opinion wouldn't be money wasted if you later upgrade to a more complete kit. It wouldn't hurt to have one in your traveling kit, to loan out, for parts, etc. You might check Amazon - last time I checked, they had a decent rebate deal + free shipping on Kreg stuff. Good luck, Andy
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My personal experience is that the more convenient the tool is, the more likely you are to go to it. Simple issues like the chaff these things create, make the vacuum attachment almost a must... for me anyway. Then there is the speed by which the clamp operates, the assortment of screws and the case it all fits in. The Master is certainly worth the money. The question remains how much you are going to use it.
Besides. it's Christmas. You wife might like one?
r
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Robatoy wrote:

This applies exponentially to workshop setup. The amount of faffing around that's required to use the right tool to complete an operation is proportional to the temptation to do it the wrong way, messing up the work or creating a safety hazard.
That's why I always bow to those who do accomplish much in very undesirable settings.
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Here are some reviews of the higher priced Kreg Kits (well worth the $$ in my opinion):
http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/kregk2000.htm http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/kregk3.htm
--
Regards,

Dean Bielanowski
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I bought the Master set and am quite pleased with it.
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Mike, Under the 'FWIW' banner, and from the 'answers' I've read, here's my input for somebody who has *never* before used the 'Pocket Hole' technique . . .
The 'technique' has been around for a long time. It is only relatively recently that commercial jigs & special drill bits have made it 'consistent and marketing made it highly visible.
To me, the justification for an expensive 'kit' is how much use it will get. I started off with a $10.oo adjustable 'two-hole' jig. A '2-step' bit came from MLCS for about $3.oo. A 'set' of 'Big Foot' Vice-Grip type clamps from Harbor Freight were already at hand, plus many, many other clamps! I used it assemble 3 'Memorial Flag Cases'. Later, I got a small Kreg 'Single Hole' jig for $10 because it *might* come in handy in close quarters. I haven't used it yet.
Bearing in mind that I don't build furniture, or cases, or 'face-frames', the $13 'kit' was good enough for what I needed. The 'special' screws are available from many sources. My choice is Stainless Steel. Plus, if your bit has a 'pointed' rather than 'flat' rebate, even those are not necessary. {Yes - I know you can split the wood, but that's why today's drills have a clutch. On a decently made joint, 'snug' is really all that's needed.}
Obviously, your requirements may be much different. If nothing else, this 'route' will give you a good learning tool before a significant investment.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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Ron Magen wrote:

I remember how surprised I was to discover them on a very old piece for the first time.
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I started with the K2000 and absolutely love it. I think if you are going to make a lot of face frames, it is worth it to get that particular model. I mounted mine on a board, and clamp it to my workbench when I'm ready to use it. When not in use it hangs on the wall out of the way but set up and ready.
Frank
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"Mike" wrote in message

Depends upon how much you will be using it.
I've owned both the Kreg2000 and the Master kit (AAMOF, sold the 2000 to a participant here a few months back).
The two reasons I made the upgrade:
- dust collection - placement of the clamp handle
... both of which save a good deal of time when doing repetitive tasks.
For the type of woodworking where I use pockethole technology (face frames for kitchen cabinets), the time savings alone was enough to pay for the jig on the first kitchen.
Other than that, any one of the Kreg options will serve you well.
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Swingman wrote:

Pocket holes can greatly speed on-the-spot jig construction.
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"B A R R Y" wrote in message

So can a brad/pin nailer and some glue. <G>
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Swingman wrote:

I agree, and often do the same. However, let me know how it works out if you want reconfigure the nailed & glued jig.
I wouldn't buy the tool specifically for jig making, but having one, I'm a proponent of "all available resources."
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"B A R R Y" wrote in message

MDF is REAL cheap hereabouts! <G>

Actually, I agree with you 1000% ... just doing a little chain tugging whilst throwing a ball back (for the hundredth time) to my 19 month old grandson, who will be leaving to go back to England in the morning [ :( ], so in need of the diversion you so generously provided.
Thanks! ;)
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