Krazy Glue

I've been reading a post made recently about a person wanting to glue a chair back together that isn't exactly a tight fit. I'm not advocating this as a fix for his chair but it was a reminder to me to make a post about this Krazy Glue I just purchased recently (and if the chair isn't a prized antique, maybe he could give this a shot).
The back story. My friend has broken printer at his business and the parts are no longer available. Yes - did all the eBay, Craig List and local shops things and just decided I could make the parts. After all, as a wood hobbyist, I do own a few tools....
Problem is a simple broken cam with a shaft on the fuser that is made from nylon. Found a 1/14" diameter x 3/8" thick nylon washer at Lowes that has a 3/8" hole. Since the cam needs a shaft about 1" long, I also found a 1-1/2" long nylon connector that is slightly under 3/8" diameter. Not exactly a tight fit and the shaft had more slop than I thought could be filled with glue.
The cam part itself is tear-drop shaped and I knew I could shape that with a Dremel. But first I needed to turn the shaft down to 1/4". In order to hold this in my Midi Delta lathe, I would have to glue the nylon pieces together before shaping the cam part so I could turn the shaft and make a step cut near the cam.
Anyone ever try to glue nylon pieces together before and have them actually bond - like permanently? Neither had I until I found this Krazy Glue - Maximum Bond - No Run Gel, Ultra thick ( KG484) that has a list on it that states it bonds ceramics, plastics, wood, porcelain, metal, leather, rubber and vinyl - and is also gap filling on porous surfaces. Well we know that Gorilla glue gap filling foam isn't good at all - so I'm doubtful of this glue's claim of working any better.
Cleaned the mating parts with alcohol and applied a thin coat to both parts. Slid the connector shaft into the nylon washer hole and let it set for about 10 minutes. Put the washer/shaft assy into my lathe chuck and started turning the shaft - fully expecting this thing to go flying at any second.
Nylon turns about like hard maple - you need to apply some pressure and I did. Took me about 10 mins of turning and checking the diameter dimension and the shaft remained solidly attached. I would have bet against this thing staying together under that kind of pressure.
This stuff works.... If the gap-filled bond can withstand the pressure of being turned and not break loose, then providing a bearing surface to ride on a metal shaft with little torque on it will never break it. Part worked perfectly in the printer...end of story.
Bob S.
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On Thu, 7 Apr 2016 21:06:28 -0400

summary is you made a printer part by turning nylon and wood and super glue
hopefully the printer does not have the built in obsolesense feature where it stops printing after hardcoded max # pages
but is it the end of the story
how long has it been in use
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