knots

Having looked at a lot of stuff over the years I've kind of decided that if I'm going to use wood with knots that they need to be whole knots, i.e., no partial knots on the edge of boards or partial knots in glued up seams. To accomplish this I rip boards to include or exclude knots or partial knots such that even with glue ups only full knots show.
I've noticed more and more commercial work, as well as a fair amount of amateur work with partial knots. Now I'm wondering if it's just me noticing this or has the prevalence of partial knots in visible surfaces really increased?
Thoughts?
John
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On 3/4/2011 10:11 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Seventy some odd years ago, when I was a youngster, you couldn't give away a board that had a knot in it. Then in the 1950's it became the rage to panel a room with Pine boards that had a whole lot of knots in them. Since then, everything went down hill to where you now have sawdust glued together and people are happy with it. I guess that you can still get wood boards that do not have a single knot in then, that is if you are slightly Rich.
Jack
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On 3/4/2011 10:41 PM, godsword wrote:

A bit of a gloat; I just bought a load of lumber (used) from a farm building that was torn down. Had to remove nails and such, but I am noticing that a lot of the lumber is clear pine. It is marked Number 2, but it is clear. Some of the 14 footers may have one knot, but that is it. The guy I bought it from said the outbuilding was built in 1972.
--
Robert Allison
New Braunfels, TX
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Seventy years ago you couldn't give away a yellow diamond. Now they are "Champagne" and cost extra.
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On Mar 4, 10:11 pm, "John Grossbohlin"

A local cabinet shop owner says he gets a request for knotty cabinets, especially hickory, from time to time. In fact we saw some work he was doing a couple of years ago that had some pretty prominent open knots in some of the doors. Sounds weird but it was really quite attractive.
RonB
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"John Grossbohlin" wrote:

------------------------------------------- SFWIW, if I have to use knotty material, I knock them totally out (full or partial knots), then fill with microballoon thickened epoxy complete with black color.
When cured, sand flush and treat it like solid material.
Truly not a woodworker purist, just the way I've done it.
Lew
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-------------------------------- Epoxy fetish?? ;-)
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"Lee Michaels" wrote

------------------------ Naw, just don't like having to work with non repaired defects.
Lew
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"There is nothing that cannot be improved by the judicious use of epoxy."
--
When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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On 3/5/2011 4:19 PM, Larry W wrote:

What about WD-40 and duct tape?
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That's one way of looking at it. Another way would be to consider knots features and not defects. Unfortunately one can't afford themselves the luxury of considering a knotty hull plank a feature.
R
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It certainly is much easier to work with wood that has no knots however it seems that they are becoming more accepted. I personally like them on the right piece and especially if they are eaually spread out. I don't want "1" knot, I want them all over. ;~) I actually prefer to see knots whith small holes, I like to fill them in with a contrasting and or complementry colored filler.
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On Mar 4, 11:11 pm, "John Grossbohlin"

I don't know - do you like women with hairy legs? That's also natural. ;)
Wood prices affect the desirability of knotty wood - at least the desirability of keeping some cash in your pocket and still getting wood you can work with. It seems to me that knottiness (is that a word?) is a fashion trend. As someone else pointed out, back in the 50's and 60's knotty paneling was in favor in much of the country. That trend seemed to hit the top - or the bottom depending on your viewpoint - with pecky cypress, where rotten wood 'sores' were fashionable.
http://retrorenovation.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/bill-pecky-cypress.jpg
As far as the location of the knots, having the complete knot uncut is certainly more stable, and if the knot is small and tight enough it won't go anywhere. After the stability/longevity issue, it's all aesthetics.
R
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