Knockdown hardware for workbench


Hi all,
I planning to put together a bed frame and was wondering if these bed rail fasteners would work for the legs and rails in a workbench? Would these control the racking forces that's put on a workbench? Just wondering....
Layne
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Oops,
I forgot to post the link for the picture of what I'm talking about. I do not work for Woodcraft...
http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?DeptID "28&FamilyID269
Thanks,
Layne

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Probably would work for a regular garage bench. But for a woodworking bench with integral vises and dogholes for hand planing, go with bench bolts, this is the idea: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p1147&cat=1,41637 ...because of that price I will be using the same type of hex cap bolts and regular hex nuts. I need far too many to buy those in multiple sets. The brass piece is called a cross dowel, personally I cannot find large enough ones. These will very much "tighten" the bench together much more than that bed hook hardware.
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brass rod + hacksaw + drill + tap
How large do you need? Enco sells brass rod up to at least 3"D.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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Even easier, drill hole for bolt, change to forstner bit, drill at right angles in long bearer so forstner meets long hole (order may be reversed). Take chisel, square up forstner hole facing end frame. Assemble bench using long clamps, insert bolts with large washer under head, slide washer on end in side hole, add bolt, tighten.
That is how my bench is held together, two such bolts per joint. What I would do in future though is seat bearer in slot or if into leg make mortise and tenon to further resist racking forces.
Peter
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That's the idea, a half moon hole for the nut. Bolt/hole runs into it. my stretchers are 4"x6" so there will be 4 per = 8 just for the stretchers. 2 per side brace = 6, one side brace is doubled 4"x4" = 4 bolts there. That one has the end vise going through it on the right side. It is a real rudimentary and beginner's design.

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I have 16, 2 per end of each long stretcher. The end frames are glued and draw bored (the proper way, not how I've seen Norm do it). The whole is further stiffened by the addition of a very tightly fitted cabinet sitting on the bottom stretchers (space on top for clamps etc.) its so well fitted its held in by two screws, one into each back leg through the sides).
Peter
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I will get there someday, but currently I am a learner and am doing much of the work by hand. I have used table saws and drill press so far, hand saw and chisels. I have three blind mortises .5% down into each leg and now it is fitting time which takes more chisel and hand saw work, low angle block plane too, for the tenons. I need to sharpen the blade on my shoulder plane and put that to use.
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Well you have more tools than I have/had when I built mine. I had a hardpoint handyman saw, a hardpoint tenon saw, three old mortise chisels and a circular saw (for the top). I would have killed for a table saw. Instead of a drill press I had my drill in a device like a router base that enables it to drill perpendicular holes, most useful for when drilling the holes in the ends of the long stretchers, not somethiing you can use a drill press for. Oh, I wore out the hardpoint tenon saw (the handle worked very loose) this taught me the value of decent tools, which I now have, though I lust after a decent rip cut tenon saw.
Peter
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I never thought og it that way really, I was thinking of buying brass rod and having them made. I suppose the rod could be cheap enough. I wonder if I would have to have the end slit cut by a machinist though, unless there is an easy method. It would take merely a ton of cutting and work to do it though. Too much. About 10-12 bench bolts or more.
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A 3/4" x 6' alloy 360 brass rod (#505-3721 from Enco for example) is selling for $22.49 - and thats enough for a /lot/ of cross dowels (assuming 1-1/2" long parts)
If you have a friend with a horizontal band saw (metal-cutting type), you just clamp the rod in the saw's vise and flip the switch. I bought HF's smallest saw (37151-7VGA on sale for $129) and have used it more than I ever thought I would for cutting (mostly) brass and aluminum for all kinds of woodworking projects.
A V-block ($10-15/pair) makes drilling rod easy, and hand tapping brass isn't difficult. I wouldn't bother slitting the end of the cross dowel since you should be able to turn these larger parts with your fingers. If this is something you really want to do, it can be done on the same saw (again, a V block makes it easier.) De-burr/bevel with a belt sander or file.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA www.iedu.com/DeSoto/
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Layne wrote:

I
bed
Would
I wouldn't even think of that kind of connector for a workbench. If you're gong to use mechanical connectors for the legs, there are a half dozen better ways to go, with my preference the Veritas cross dowel set...it's fairly expensive (+ or - 25 USD), but you only need one set per bench. And like all Veritas items, it's well made and good looking.
You could also use standard 13mm cross dowels (diameter) with 1/4-20 bolts, and double them. Those are available at Woodworker's Supply. Rockler has 10mm cross dowels, which can also be doubled, and, IIRC, also use 1/4-20 bolts.
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Thanks guys for your input and suggestions. I'll nix the bed rail hardware idea. I've seen the Veritas bench bolts before and will get a set. I've been putting off making my bench for too long.
Now that I'm moving into a 1bdrm apartment I'll be using the bedroom as a workshop and using the living area as a studio. :-) The only prob is the door from the living area to the bedroom isn't a straight path. The bedroom door and the bathroom door share a "cove" I guess you could call it and the bedroom doorway and the living room doorway are at right angles. Couldn't even fit my Bowflex through into the bedroom. It's going to limit what I can make. I can't make things too wide or long. :-(
Thanks,
Layne
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Quite the good luck then. What design are you building BTW?
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Something *very* simple. Flat top, rails and legs. Perhaps no vise, just stops and dog holes (round). Just maybe later I might breakdown and get a nice vise. I'm thinking of getting a nice size maple cutting block/workbench top from Anawalt Lumber here in Los Angeles. Good price and no shipping charges...and it will save me time. When it comes to making shop furniture I'm admittedly lazy. :-)
Layne
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Those Veritas wonder dogs and pups should do the job I suspect, and have been told. You need "something" to clamp with, if you have dog holes. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pA645&cat=1,41637
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Yes. That was my thinking exactly. Use a combination of regular dogs or stop and wonder dogs to hold the workpiece. I'm thinking if I space the dog holes right I shouldn't have to take too much time clamping with the wonder dogs. It won't be as fast as a quick release vise, but may be quicker than the Veritas bench vise. Anyways, I'm not a pro so time is not of the essence. Economy and simplicity are.
Layne
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