Kitchen Painting Question?

I have painted and rebuilt 7 kitchen in the last year and every now and then I get what I believe they call Flashing on some wide long panels like pantry and oven cabinets. What causes this? By Flashing I mean some areas are more glossy then others. Is it the wood or the way I'm painting them? I use a high end 3 stage Earlex HVLP gun and turbine. Spraying Dunn-Edwards exterior usually white enamel which in California is probably a latex to some extent.
Found a cabinet millworks outfit that supplies cabinet doors, drawer fronts, drawer boxes with 4 corner dovetails, and cabinet boxes if needed. All are made from whatever species of wood you need and they can build all these for cheaper then I can buy the material.
Thanks, Rich
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4 possibilities I see are:
1) Under/overspray. Look at your spraying technique. Ask someone else to film you or critique you when you spray to pick up any problems.
2) Lack of primer. If you primed the wood properly, discount that one.
3) Are you blending the paint well enough before pouring it into the cup? Unmixed additives can make a big difference.
4) Are you waiting until the first coat is completely dry? Dry to the touch and recoatable are often two different things. Some paints have windows. (IE, either paint within 2 hours or after 24 hours, etc.)
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Don't think is this. I spray fairly close to my work, 6-8"

Prime everything. Zinsser Stain Blocker Primer. The good stuff.

Haven't used an additive? Thinned a bit with water. What do you suggest as an additive and should I be using distilled water?

This is the one thing I know I haven't done. This could be my problem. Try to get all the painting done in one day.
Is there a sandpaper grit that I can use that will take down very little paint but will smooth and shin the semi gloss paint?
Thank you for the response, and any suggestions are greatly appreciated!!
Rich

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Rich wrote:

I think he is probably referring to additives already in the paint; specifically, flatting agent. Anything other than glossy would have it.
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On 3/15/2012 9:37 AM, Rich wrote:

Exposure during dry time. If you paint/varnish several boards and partially protect the surface, like leaning them directly over each other at an angle but not touching, the area that is more protected will tend to be less glossy.
If you have a condition where your paint is drying faster in some parts than others you surface will differ in gloss.
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