kiln dried more resistant to dry rot

does kiln drying impart any additional resistance to dry rot
i have some old kiln dried lumber i think it is fir but might be cedar
it seems to be free of dry rot but i do not know if that is due to the wood or the kiln drying
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On Fri, 15 Jul 2016 11:03:42 -0700, Electric Comet

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On Fri, 15 Jul 2016 20:07:38 +0100

i wonder if that really applies to all woods
this stuff seems really stable as it is
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Dr Jagels writes a column on wood for Wooden Boat magazine. I beleive he covered that question not so long ago (altho more in the context of damp rot), and I beleive the conclusion was that air dried lumber is more rot resistant.
If you're really curious, you might search back issues of Wooden Boat.
John
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There is no such thing as "dry rot;" dry wood does not rot. What appears to be dry rot is wood that has been damp or wet at some time, rotted, and the n dried. Next time you're in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo see the collectio n of wood furniture that spent 3,000 years in arid conditions and is still serviceable today.
There is no mechanism by which the technique used to dry wood can affect it s resistance to rot. Keep it dry and the microorganisms that cause wood rot cannot survive.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Well, for certain values. Get it above a certain temperature and the chemistry changes. It won't rot but it will be more dimensionally stable, more brittle, and less strong.
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On 7/17/2016 12:04 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

I saw an article on Pinterest or some such talking about burning, or heating wood to make it rot and insect resistant, instead of using pressure treated with chemicals.
Didn't read it but sounded interesting.
--
Jack
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The Vikings did so with the ship lumber, nothing is ever really new, nor safe.
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On Thu, 28 Jul 2016 09:51:08 -0400

did a tiny bit of research and throughout history charring the exterior of wood was a technique used as a preservative
it only makes sense in certain applications
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On 7/17/2016 9:55 AM, Davoud wrote:

Actually there is a type of treatment to wood that involves no chemicals that keeps it from rotting.
There is a "relatively" new process that heats the wood to, IIRC, in excess of 300 degrees F. This renders the wood unable to be a food source for mold, mildew, rot, insects, etc.
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