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On 7/28/2016 1:05 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Scott Phillips is horrible, and his wife is even worse. (horrible woodworkers, I don't know them, other that they shouldn't be on TV.) He is one of the very few, if not only, TV woodworker that leaves every known contraption on his saw instead of lying and saying safety devices have been removed only for visual and vocal effects. He starts every show with the same dumb ass safety advice, a testimonial to how really stupid Americans have become. Sort of like buying a flashlight and finding 20 pages of safety instructions and a quarter page on how to turn it on and install batteries... Don't eat batteries, don't put batteries in microwave oven, Don't use underwater, don't use as a jack stand, and on and on.
Personally, I think people are smart enough to figure most of this on their own, and those that don't, telling them is breaking a fundamental law of nature, survival of the fittest. (too many idiots polluting the gene pool nowadays)
If you can't find his show, here is all you need to know:
Unplug everything before adjusting, changing blades, and so on. Use safety glasses and face shield at all times. Don't ever set your router down until it comes to a complete stop. Don't ever put any part of your body in front of a band saw blade Wear ear muffs before using a tool that makes any noise. Be sure to read all operating instructions and and use every safety device known to man before using anything. I'm sure I missed a few hundred, but you get the idea.
My advice is use common sense. If you don't have any of that, stick to Pokemon and watching re-runs on TV, or, let nature take it's course.
BTW, I've been using tools for a long time, too long, and was never once injured by a power tool. I have been nicked a few times with hand tools. I find the chances of getting hurt with a hand tool is greater than a power tool, probably because you have a tendency to throw caution to the wind, and wham.
--
Jack
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On 7/30/2016 10:07 AM, Jack wrote:

Add Brad Stagg, The Ultimate Workshop show. He was demonstrating how to cut a dado and pushing the work through the dado set with the miter gauge. All good so far. Then he stops and almost panics when the camera show that the guard was still on the saw. that absolutely should have been reshot.
Add, Bruce Johnson. He had a diy show and insisted on calling his SCMS a RAS.

You have been lucky.
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On 7/30/2016 1:34 PM, Leon wrote:

Yes, but I'm also careful. I've never been lucky or unlucky with my unguarded raw table saw. Never been lucky with my router, shaper, planer, belt/disk sander, band saw, grinder, mortiser either. I have been lucky with my lathe and drill press when I left the chuck key in and turned them on. Also I've had lathe turnings break, but never came near getting injured. Those incidents I've been lucky I guess, but I don't consider lathe and drill press very dangerous tools, so I get careless more so than my other power tools. (I do wear eye protection with the lathe, and other tools, but I don't protect against an idiot turning them on with a chuck key in the chuck) I really don't get careless with my table saw or shaper, both tools require great respect. I never turn on the grinder or wire wheel w/o eye protection.
Having said all that, I have noticed with advancing age, my mind tends to wander more than ever, and that, combined with less usage, it's becoming more of a challenge to remain reasonably safe. There is a time when one should look to other interests I guess, but fortunately it seems my interest in taking on large projects is diminishing as well as my ability to focus.
Photography seems safe enough...yuck!
--
Jack
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I saw some advice regarding the chuck key that's worth repeating: The chuck key is either in your hand or in it's home (which isn't the chuck!) It's easy to leave the tool where you last used it, but for the chuck key this could be very bad.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

I don't think I have ever left a chuck key in a chuck, seems some how like leaving a wrench on a saw arbor. You naturally remove it when finished. I guess some one should invent a chuck stop. :-)
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I haven't left any keys in drill chucks, but lathe chucks are another story. Usually you're messing with the material, trying to get it to run true and it's easy to get focused on the material and forget about the key.
A chuck stop would be easy enough. Just put a couple microswitches where the key goes and if one of those microswitches is pushed the lathe will refuse to start. Even better may be optical switches, just so the tool doesn't have to be pushed down. (If one of those patent trolls buys the idea, this post counts a "Prior Art"!)
Some lathes DO have a chuck stop... When the lathe starts, the key stays in the chuck and then suddenly and violently hits the lathe and bad things happen.
Puckdropper
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On 04 Aug 2016 10:46:37 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

It's even easier than that. Just spring load a pin in the center of the key, so it pushes the key out if you're not holding it in. Don't worry about the disclosure. It's not patentable. ;-)

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On 8/4/16 5:08 AM, Leon wrote:

I only have 3 drills with chuck keys. One is a big-ass Black and Decker corded drill with a ton of power. It has a cool rubber grommet type thing attached to the cord that holds the key very securely.
The other is a 25 year-old little Skil corded hammer drill that helped me build my first home 20+ years back. It has the little recessed, friction-fit hole that is "supposed" to hold the key. I don't know why I still keep that drill, other than the sentimental value. :-)
The 3rd is the drill press. It was very frustrating to look for the chuck key, whenever I'd take it with me or leave it on the bench. I finally placed a magnet on the belt lid for attaching the key when not in use. That's where it stays and I don't remember the last time I misplaced it.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 8/4/2016 12:13 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Great minds ...
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
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On Thursday, August 4, 2016 at 1:15:35 PM UTC-4, Swingman wrote:

Mine is crudely but effectively tied to the table height release lever...that's the way it came when I picked it up, and seems to work for me...
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Mine's on one of those little tables you can attached to the DP column. My key has a spring-loaded tip, so it's almost impossible to leave _in_ the chuck if you let go.
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Whatsa "DP Column"?
nb --resident rw dummy
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DrillPress column.
John
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Thanks, John.
nb
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On Thu, 04 Aug 2016 12:15:24 -0500, Swingman wrote:

Same here, but I put the magnet on the casting at eye level - even I can't forget where the key is when it's right in my line of vision :-).
--
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On Thu, 4 Aug 2016 23:18:34 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard

Mine has a clip on the right side of the DP head that the key fits into.
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On Thursday, August 4, 2016 at 7:18:39 PM UTC-4, Larry Blanchard wrote:

That's exactly why I drilled the hole in the table! If the hole is empty, I'd better start looking for the key.
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On Thursday, August 4, 2016 at 1:15:35 PM UTC-4, Swingman wrote:

I drilled a hole in the back corner of my drill press table to accept the key.
On very rare occasions I have to remove it to use the entire table, but for the most part it's not in the way.
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On 8/5/2016 10:12 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

the table that is adjustable with slots
My chuck key has a permanent home in the slots in the base.
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On 8/5/2016 10:12 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

--
Jack
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