kickback and technique

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Right
so
the
piece
fence
Thanks for the reply Swingman. I didn't control the piece properly and that was the main problem. The push block was just a piece of scrap I had handy. I had limited downward pressure. Also, cutting from the left side seems to have been a better plan. I needed up using butt joints in the end. I was just making some brackets to hold up curtain hardware so I really didn't need the miter cut anyway.
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"Brikp" wrote in message

that
handy.
Make yourself a push device that adds some control to the workpiece when you rip stock and you'll go a long way to alleviating kick back when making that type of cut.
My modification of the old "shoe" style push block works well for me in this regard. You can see what it looks like on the Fixtures and Jigs page of my website below.
It is real easy to copy and cutout with a jig or band saw. Make some of different thickness plywood for when you're ripping narrow stock.
And remember ... mount and use a splitter on your table saw. A properly installed splitter is the first line of defense against kickback.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/04/04
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cut
If I were going to design a disaster, I couldn't do a better job than what your scenario is. You cannot control a piece that small with a simple push stick.
Some possible safer solutions:
1. Use a cross cut sled with fixed 45 degree angle block and a hold down clamp. I think that would be one of the safest approaches.
2. You could also do it with hand tools - cut off with a hand saw, then finish up with a hand plane using a 45 degree shooting board. See this link http://tinyurl.com/627hs and look at the picture labeled mitre trimming.
3. Make a quick and dirty mini-sled from a larger board that could be held against your miter fence. Make a simple hold down clamp using the principals shown on this taper jig: http://tinyurl.com/5pe2e
Bob
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Right
so
push
link
principals
Thanks Bob for your response. The sled seems to be the consensus and a proper hold down to go along with it. Thanks again. I'm still learning.
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After reading other replies and re-reading your post, I see I mis-interpreted what you were doing. My suggestions are not complete accurate because I thought you were cutting a 45 degree angle, as opposed to mitering and edge.

Right
so
push
link
principals
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Thanks everyone for the quick responses. This is a great group! I will also contribute where and when I can.

cut
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Brikp wrote:

And thanks to posting the question. Woodworkers of all levels need to be reminded of safety issues all the time.
Josie
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Better to have had the fence on the opposite side of the blade and used a hold down "block/push stick" to feed the piece.
You just witnessed why many believe that the left tilt saw is better for these type cuts.

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Absolutely, put the fence on the LEFT side of the blade for a bevel cut on a right tilt saw.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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FWIW, this would not have happened if he had used a RAS.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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"Rumpty" wrote in message

Yeah right, Rumpty ... he'd probably lost a whole damn arm by now. Ya gotta be a smart, mean pit bull (sorry wrong thread) of a mutha to survive using a RAS for any length of time.
--
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amen to that brother...it is only a matter of time that one will get hurt ripping on a radial arm saw.......ripping on a radial arm saw is 1945 technology and is so far out of date today in safety and just plain common sense. If one must rip on a radial arm, please be careful and use every safety device known....... Mike from American Sycamore
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Mike at American Sycamore wrote:

It sounds like you have some stories to tell. Please share.

--
--John
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I thopught about using my SCMS but it wasn't setup. I don't have room for a RAS.

Right
so
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That's what I was thinking...
Wouldn't a mitre saw be the best thing for something like this? Especially for safety?
-- -Jim
If you want to reply by email its --> ryan at jimryan dot com Please use BCC and lets all avoid spam

a
to
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a
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Brikp wrote:

PLEASE - DON'T TRY MAKING THIS CUT ON AN SCMS.
3 1/2" 4 1/2" +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ | / / <---- mitered +--------------------------+----------------------------+ edge
If I understand it right he wants to miter the 4 1/2" edge. On an SCMS that would mean that the 3 1/2" edge would be against the fence and the 4 1/2" edge would be 90s to the fence. That's a recipe for a problem. Because of the gap in the fence, only a couple of inches of the 3 1/2" "against the fence" will actually be in contact with the fence so it won't be supported very well. Personally, I don't like getting my fingers closer than 6" to spinning carbide teeth either.
If the miter cut is also to be along the grain - a rip cut rather than acrossed the grain - the potential for a problem goes up some more since MS, CMS and SCMS aren't intended for along the grain rip cuts. I learned this one the hard way - and on a 12" SCMS.
The safest way to miter the edge in question is with a chamfering bit in a router table and a zero clearance fence - with a small part jig or paddle. (assuming you're a Normite and not a Follower of Roy/Neander)
charlie b
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Brikp wrote:

Got a router table? If so, try a 45 degee chammfering bit. It would be preferable to have a zero clearance insert fence - a chamfering bit for 3/4" stock has a moderately large diameter. There are all kinds of jigs and things for holding small parts for routing on a router table.
charlie b
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In case no one else has mentioned this in reply, you might consider thie GRR-RIpper. http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?&offerings_id 477 (Others MAY have better prices.) While I get a bit nervous cutting any small pieces, I've used it with considered success. (Success w/ wood, BTW; it did not well grip plastic.) -- Igor
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