Kerosene Heater in the Garage

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I've used a 23,000 BTU round model in my smoke detector equipped basement and garage for 15 years.
- I turn it off and let it cool (or remove it) before using volatile stuff. - I take it out of the basement (walk-out, no stairs) to start it and turn it off. This keeps the smell out of the house. I don't bother in the garage. - Every 2-3 tanks, I "dry burn" it to clean the wick. - I use my Jet AFS-1000B to even the heat distribution - I never leave it unattended
Works great for me. My wife is SUPER sensitive to odors, and she doesn't complain. <G>
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I have used a Kerosene heater for years with no problem. In our area, and even with elevated Kerosene prices, it is much cheaper to use than propane. I have some rules.
1) I work in a three car garage and all vehicles are OUT. 2) No gasoline cans in the garage 3) The heater is well away from woodworking and the Kero can 4) Sweep up often in attempt to keep dust down; and clean the exterior of the heater from time to time. 5) It gets turned off when any finishing starts (using oil based finishes, solvents, etc, )
I also have a 1,500 watt cube heater that I run with the Kero heater. On mildly cold days I can often take the edge off with the Kerosene heater, and then turn it off and the cube will sustain the temperature for a while. I also keep the cube going when I'm doing finishing.
It does stink a little when started and after shutoff. No problems otherwise.
Main thing - use your head.
RonB

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Alright I am in ancient times, I use a coal/wood burning furnace, courtesy of a military auction, paid $10 for the pallet of items. The thing sometimes gets cherry hot but man it takes the cold out of the air.
Some of the newer kerosene heaters can use multi-fuels, like biodiesel, diesel, kerosene, and there are a few others. I use a 40,000 one at my business and it works great. You will get water on your tools, due to rapidly heating up the air it will condense the water in the air onto all your surfaces. A quick an easy fix is to wipe all your tools down with old motor oil so the water does not attack as fast. Also when your air in your space begins to start cooling again, the moisture will again form on surfaces.
Jon

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I live in the Baltimore area and I insulated my garage and used a small propane heater took about forty minutes to get to 70 and had no problems staying there even on the coldest days 10 to 15 degrees. also no problem with moisture. and to top it all off it's relatively cheap
len
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