Kerosene Heater in the Garage

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My garage is not airtight, and now that the weather has dropped, it's too cold to woodwork without heat. I'm looking at a kerosene heater. I don't think ventilation is a problem since I can feel a little draft and I think this kerosene heater will raise the temps enough for me to work. What do you think? Is this a basic solution, or bad idea for some reason?
Thanks,
S.
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I have heard that Kerosene heaters introduce a lot of humidity to the air, but I could be wrong.
I use a small propane heater that uses 2 cylinders like goes with a camp stove. Got it clearance last spring for about $25. Sucker gets hot and will run for about 12 hours on high. I can usually get about a full weekend on 2 cylinders unless it is real cold.
samson wrote:

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How cold is real cold? I use a 30,000 Btu heater and it is not enough once it gets down to 20.
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Here in Memphis, it rarely every gets down below 20 or so. usually only about 20 days below freezing each winter.
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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wrote:

they do and more smell propane is better.
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mapdude wrote:

I use kerosene all winter. I don't know if I'm doing the right thing or not. I'm noticing a bit more rust on my tools than normal, but I've used kerosene in the past without that problem.
Odor's not really a problem beyond startup, assuming the wick is adjusted properly and the burner is operating right.
The heat is tremendous. mapdude may get as much or more heat from propane, but kerosene is what I have so I use that.
Tanus
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The moisture has more to do with you being there than the heater. You're putting a lot into the warming air which is now capable of holding it, where your moisture precipitated when it was cold and saturated.
Rust comes from the time when the air has lots of moisture while it warms, and the metal is still cold. Condensation.
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Water vapor is a byproduct of combustion - kerosene or propane.

Damn - I envy you. Here in central NY that wouldn't even warm the kindling for the fire.
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-Mike-
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I use a propane heater connected to a 'barbecue grill' sized propane tank. You need to buy an extension hose to connect it (Home Depot). You can see a picture of mine in action in my Woodshop-a-garage here:
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/pictures/walnut_footbd.jpg
--
www.garagewoodworks.com



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samson wrote:

Shouldn't be a problem. I use them all the time in areas where I am working. The only drawback to kerosene is the price. I use about 10-15 gallons a week when it gets cold and it is running about 5 bucks a gallon if you buy in bulk. More if you get the ripoff 5 gallon cans at home depot. I think they are charging about 9 dollars a gallon for it.
--
Robert Allison
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really leaky, that should be okay...but the cost and the smell...that smell...man.... it gets into everything.
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Robatoy wrote:

Brings back good memories of the barn during the winter when I was growing up. It's not all that bad.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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On Fri, 30 Nov 2007 21:07:17 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

I do know that smell. <G>
However, if you start and shut it down outside, and burn the wick dry on a regular basis (also outside), it really makes a huge difference. Before I did this, my wife would come home from school and complain. Now, she only "knows it's on".
It is getting expensive, though! I paid $4.25/ga., at a gas station in Portland, CT. last Saturday, because the fuel oil dealer that normally charges ~ $3.50 was sold out..
FWIW, the newer stuff seems to burn even cleaner and is labeled on the pump as "low-sulfur" kero. Since it's higher priced than diesel, there's been no dye in the last couple of fills I bought.
When I come up for a furnace / boiler replacement in the next 5-10 years, I plan on adding capacity for an extra, separately controllable, hydronic loop to the system to heat the shop.
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If you have problems with the smell, your heater is out of wack. I use a kerosene heater with no problems.
wrote:

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Not necessarily - are people using K1 or K2?
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"samson" wrote:

I used one in the winter back when they were very popular and kerosene was low cost, neither of which exist today.
As an alternate, I'd take a look at propane fired radient heaters.
Much better deal today.
Lew
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I've got one of those double-headed radiant propane rigs what bolts to the top of a propane cylinder. Does very well in my 20X20 garage. Be warned that touching the back of one of those burners will instantly melt your skin (and I have the scar to prove it).
--
NuWave Dave in Houston



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Propane is a hydrocarbon with 3 carbon atoms in a row, surounded by hydrogens, sort of like:
H H H | | | H-C-C-C-H | | | H H H
When it burns, all the H's make water, the C's give CO2, carbon dioxide, (hopefully not CO, carbon monoxide).
Longer hydrocarbons have relatively fewer hydrogens, so would yield less water, more CO2.
But kerosene smels, and propane is probably easier to get ...
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Best regards
Han
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Han wrote:

Used to be that just about every gas station had a kerosene pump. Haven't seen one in years--today I'm going to see if I can find one and check prices--should be cheaper than diesel because no highway tax. The 7 bucks a gallon that Home Despot charges is ludicrous.
If we ever go to a hydrogen economy rust is going to be one of the unintended consequences I suspect.
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As long as we are in the chemistry department, may as well mention the oxides of nitrogen that are emitted into the workspace with any unvented heater. Better to install a modern vented propane heater and use a big tank to take advantage of bulk delivery savings. Next step is to find a way to eliminate the draft around the garage doors.

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