kerfing underside of tabletop?

Hello,
I'm in the process of making a table top of curly maple (36x15). It's an extra wide board (about 17in), which has about a half inch twist. Have any of you use a kerfing technique for making the board more flexible. I have access to a big jointer, but I'd like not to lose the thickness.
Thanks.
Curt Blood Connecticut, USA
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Curt: If some of the "twist" is just cup, have you tried wetting just the concave side a bit then laying it down on that side awhile to reduce or eliminate the cup? It's always amazed me how much you can get a board to move this way. In fact, if you lay it on the lightly dampened concave side in direct sun a board may move so much and so fast that it'll cup out the other way, so check it frequently or you'll have to flip it to get the cup out of the other side. Lay it concave side down on dewy grass in sun and you won't have to wet it at all. Kinda fun actually. Ralph

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I've never personally tried but did see the almighty do it on one of his shows. He kerfed the board so he could make it flat then filled the kerf with some type of epoxy. Sorry, I don't remember what kind of epoxy it was or the show.
If you search through here you may find it http://www.normstools.com / or try pinging LRod, he may know what type of epoxy.
I've fixed it by ripping the board then gluing it back together. Barely noticeable.
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