Keeping FedEx busy

Yesterday was one of those good days for me. After having had a Bosch SCMS on backorder at Amazon, my FedEx driver finally delivered. And 2 hours later, came my Wagner 220 moisture meter.
The Bosch looks like a good unit, although the head has more side to side play than I expected. Maybe the rail bushings need to be tightened up, but the manual doesn't mention adjusting them at all. The action of the slider is very smooth. It cut through an oak 4x4 like it was butter. The shipping carton arrived in perfect condition, not a single dent. All in all, I'm happy with it.
As for the MM, it's not something I absolutely need. It's just something I absolutely wanted. I'm starting to take interest in buying lumber from a supplier unsurfaced and dimensioning it myself. Maybe learn how to resaw? I figured a MM would come in handy in case I got some wood that wasn't dried long enough. I took it to a local borg just for kicks (I think I need a life if this is my idea of kicks) and came up with some fairly consistent readings. Most of the S4S oak/cherry/walnut was reading around 8.5%. Except for the PTL, which can be very wet anywhere you get it from. I like the fact you can set it for different wood species. ANother satisfied purchase.
Now I lust after a DJ20.... But that's another story.
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Questions for owners of moisture meters.
If the lumber in your workshop is all at twelve percent, do you just forego woodworking? Do you humidify in winter when its 4%?
I look at meters like I look at micrometers. They give great information, but it's really not worth much.

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I have and use one and think that, for me, it is very useful. My primary use is to insure that all of the wood for a single project is at the same moisture level. This way I know how to build to allow for wood movement and about how much, and in which directions, the wood will move over time. Since most of my work is furniture, I use dry wood only; the absolute reading is not as important as the relative reading.
I have posted before about the use of a "moisture stick" that I refer to in my work. It is an off cut from a table top (flat sawn strip about 26" long) that I use to check for current shop moisture levels and movement predictions.
YMMV

web site: http://www.calanb.com
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Stored same place pretty much does that.
I take it you mix from several locations and use it to avoid acclimation?

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Only partly valid. Stored same place (for long enough) only gets everything to the same moisture level; it will not help in knowing which way the wood will move and how much in a different environment or at a different time.

Alan Bierbaum
web site: http://www.calanb.com
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Yep, that requires prior knowledge of where it will go and what the conditions will be there.
OK, enjoy your meter.

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