Just starting need info or help

Hello,im Scott,and just starting to work with wood. i have a few magazines on it,and my grandfathers old books and patterns.. what i was wondering is.. i feel kinda. well not as involved enough without a shop of some sort..and everythign would get wet.. i do not have any space that i could store my projects.or tools properly. i live on a 58 acre farm,but i live on one acre of it. ad my inlaws have a shop.but it is very very cluttered with alot of other stuff. cant get into it.and my step dad is selling some old antique stuff of my grandfathers of which i am buying from him to keep in the family.anyone know of an cheap and inexpensive way to build a shop? until the income taxes roll in? thanks
Scott Brown. < if you live inthe nw Ga area. i could use some help on shop plans.thanks>
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Well, it is summer. A lean to type of arrangement with weighted roll down plastic sheets comes to mind.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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Keep an eye out for Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking books 1&2 bound together about $20.00 in memory serves. Also post to alt.home.repair on shop plans.
On 16 Jul 2003 02:13:51 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (ScottnDess) wrote:

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You are in a rural area so I don't know if you would have these available near you, but many people in my area use rental storage units as shops.

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plans.thanks>
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I suspect many of us use a garage but you may not have that option. Does anyone near you make these metal buildings that sell for around $1000? Maybe you could look at one and build it yourself for 500-600. Sears sells some and so does Lowe's. I have seen old semi trailers and school buses used as well as barns. Maybe an old oceangoing shipping container? You run into problems with HVAC (cooling/heating) as well as electricity.
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im looking into buying one of those sheds from lowes for around 198$ its small but i guess i could make some mod's on it. a window and a place for a small ac unit.and my Grandfather-in-law is an electrician...so perhaps he can run power to it..
Thanks everyone
Scott.
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Over this past winter I built a 10 x 14 shed. It has 8 ft high walls, built with rough cut lumber. The walls are 2 x 4, 16 on center. I used 1 x 14 planks for the walls with batton strips. I put a metal roof on it. the floor is pressure treated 2 x 6 with 3/4 ply. the floor is the only wood that is not rough cut. The entire thing, including nails and cinder blocks, cost me $450. Have lowes or home depot beat that. The "shed" has since become my shop.
Tony
ScottnDess wrote:

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On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 20:27:16 -0400, Tony Gagnon

Be _really really >really<_ careful about shed kits.
I made the mistake of buying a 10' x 10' x 18' shed because I didn't have the time to do it the right way.
Bad idea.
I was out of town for two weeks when it was delivered, and Herself didn't think to have our handyman take a close look at it.
1. The thing arrived on two 4' x 6' pallets. So yes, there is no piece of lumber longer than 6' in the entire structure.
2. It is >>>2" x 3"<<< lumber throughout. Nothing you can buy to finish out that shed fits - electrical boxes, windows, nada. I have the strangest looking white vinyl double-insulated windows you have ever seen. They're about an inch thicker than the walls. I hid that by trimming the windows inside and out with 1 x 2 on 1 x 4. No one has noticed the double trim.
3. The book said 11 hours to put it up. Try three days, and I needed two helpers to get it done in that time. I had to toss about 10% of the structural pieces due to extreme warp and bow.
4. I used R30 insulation, and had a lot of fun stuffing it into the 2" x 3" walls. Had to use 1/4" ply to keep the interior from bulging.
It's up and working, but it was a lot more expensive than a custom shed would have cost (I know, I checked). If you don't look to closely, it doesn't look bad from the outside, and from the inside I just tell folks I ran the wiring conduit on the walls to make it easier to extend a circuit if I need to.
[yeah . . . sure]
Be _really really >really<_ careful about shed kits. Cheers, Fred McClellan the dash plumber at mindspring dot com
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Fred McClellan wrote:

On the one hand, I actually paid $500 for a stupid plastic 7'x 7' shed because I was in a big hurry to get something up, and I thought it would be easy (and those shed kits you speak of all looked so very crappy.) (Trying to get the crap out of my 10x12 shed so it could be a dedicated shop...) After three days, I was ready to take a sledge hammer to the stupid thing. Actually, I did, but luckily it was high-impact plastic. :) Total pain in the ass all the way around, and for the space I got, it was nowhere close to worth the effort. (I guess these things are OK if you have a concrete slab handy. If the surface isn't 100% level, the damn thing ain't going to go together, and that's all there is to it.)
On the other, my neighbor. Bought some lumber, some pre-fab trusses (I think, won't swear to it--he might have built the trusses when I wasn't looking), some windows, and a big roll-up door. Spent a few weekends beating and hammering. His shop is something like 15x20, well-lit, 12' ceiling, heat, A/C, the whole nine yards. I'm not sure if he drew it on paper or what, but that dude has some skills, let me tell ya. He paid $800 for the whole shebang. $800.
I think when the time comes to replace my shop with a bigger one, I'm going to see if I can pay my neighbor to help me design and ensure that I don't screw up the building of the thing. I'll leave those shed kits at the store.
The only sad part of this story is that he doesn't have anything good in there. A huge compressor to run air tools, and a big industrial sewing machine. He re-upholsters furniture for fun. His woodworking is strictly carpentry. Not that there's anything wrong with his carpentry!!
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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