just slightly off topic, but mostly on topic; Make-up air

Hey All, I just want to relate an experience I had yesterday in my basement woodshop. We have a three flue chimney with a coal stove in the basement (shop side) and our oil fired boiler which uses another flue on the "not quite" clean side. This is also our laundry room and my wife went ahead and ran a load of clothes in the drier because they did not dry completely from being outside earlier in the day. Up stairs is our woodstove which uses the third flue. We had a fire going in the woodstove and all is going well. I was in my shop marking layout lines on the legs for my dining room table when I smelled wood smoke which I traced to the coal stove. I never had that happen before but soon I realized it was the clothes drier removing room air and the main source of make-up air was coming from the flue of the coal stove. We rarley use the drier, relying mostly on hanging clothes outside or nearby the two stoves to dry.
I never smelled oil fumes when the drier was used so it either was never running when the boiler was firing or the air paths were not affected. This just goes to show you that you really need to provide make-up air if you exhaust your dust collector outside. A clothes drier passes a lot less air than a DC but its results are almost as significant. (My dust collector uses a large pleated filter so it always returns filtered air to the shop.)
By the way, I am copying the design for the Hayrake table that was shown on the Fine Woodworking site a few months ago.
Hope everybody's team wins today except for you Steelers fans. Go Ravens! Marc
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HRV
WE use them. --------------------
"marc rosen" wrote in message
Hey All, I just want to relate an experience I had yesterday in my basement woodshop. We have a three flue chimney with a coal stove in the basement (shop side) and our oil fired boiler which uses another flue on the "not quite" clean side. This is also our laundry room and my wife went ahead and ran a load of clothes in the drier because they did not dry completely from being outside earlier in the day. Up stairs is our woodstove which uses the third flue. We had a fire going in the woodstove and all is going well. I was in my shop marking layout lines on the legs for my dining room table when I smelled wood smoke which I traced to the coal stove. I never had that happen before but soon I realized it was the clothes drier removing room air and the main source of make-up air was coming from the flue of the coal stove. We rarley use the drier, relying mostly on hanging clothes outside or nearby the two stoves to dry.
I never smelled oil fumes when the drier was used so it either was never running when the boiler was firing or the air paths were not affected. This just goes to show you that you really need to provide make-up air if you exhaust your dust collector outside. A clothes drier passes a lot less air than a DC but its results are almost as significant. (My dust collector uses a large pleated filter so it always returns filtered air to the shop.)
By the way, I am copying the design for the Hayrake table that was shown on the Fine Woodworking site a few months ago.
Hope everybody's team wins today except for you Steelers fans. Go Ravens!
Marc
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Bullshit! Just read some of the dozens of complaints here over the last few years.
Maybe speak from some real experience instead of just trolling.
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On Sun, 23 Oct 2011 10:05:44 -0400, Dave wrote:

How did you manage to do a reply with the wrong subject? A new "feature" of Agent?
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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"Larry Blanchard" wrote in message wrote:

How did you manage to do a reply with the wrong subject? A new "feature" of Agent?
============= People love to get these fancy readers and newsgroups have many problems with basic communication confusion due to lack of expertise with them.
Why do some have to make things so complicated?
--
Eric


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On Sun, 23 Oct 2011 12:24:04 -0700 (PDT), marc rosen

Fix the leaks and then properly modulate the air exchange for health.
Here ya go: http://goo.gl/HWDDo
Unless your house is much larger, in which case you need something more like these: http://goo.gl/5fipl or Cha CHING: http://goo.gl/0HK4J
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
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Larry Jaques wrote:

every time the dog farts your ears pop. Like living in a submarine. So then you need a $3000 snorkel to breathe.
--
Gerald Ross

Hi! I can't remember your name either.
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wrote:

Pshaw! When we built our house it was so "tight" that the first time we vacuumed the carpet all the sheet rock nails popped.
Max
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LOL
When we ran the central vac our toilets spit water onto the ceilings and my ears popped.
-------------- "Max" wrote in message
Pshaw! When we built our house it was so "tight" that the first time we vacuumed the carpet all the sheet rock nails popped.
Max
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wrote:

Quite the evocative description, Ger.
It sounds illogical but there's a method to their madness. A thermal exchange unit, it warms the air as it breathes in winter so it doesn't cost you an arm and a leg for your air leaks. Regular leaks leak hot air out and suck cold air in indiscrimately, perhaps into one room alone. They cost lots of HVAC time to recover from.

The bigun was a 600cfm monster for a bigass megaMcMansion, methinks. The littleun (60cfm, $321) would work for my 1,500s/f home.
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
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At one time, during a tornado it was recommended that you keep one window away from the tornado open to avoid your house exploding from the sudden change in pressure. When this advice was debunked, one of the things that was pointed out was that most houses are so leaky they'll easily adjust to the change. Now that we're building tighter and tighter houses, might we have to worry about explosion again? *g*
Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote

He equipped his dome with a "lift up" vent on top of the dome. If the pressure dropped out side of the house, the vent popped up and saved the structure. The point being if the dome was anchored well, it could easily weather strong storm events.
I assume there was enough air left in the building to support life. And I would want some way to get more air in the building quickly after this event. Wouldn't want to be a building that was sealed tight as a drum and have all it's internal air sucked out.
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Those prices are out-to-lunch.
Home Depot sells good units in Canuckistan for about $6-700. Piping. vents and control would be extra. I think I paid about $550 for mine through a heating contractor distributor. (different brand)
Years back, I put a 2" PVC pipe into my cold air return pipe and stuck it outside years ago. That works not too badly. The windows stops leaking and the draughts get better in the house. In cold climates too much pressure is not good as it can drive moisture into the framing and freeze.
http://reviews.homedepot.ca/1998/971356/reviews.htm
Looks like HD discontinued this one.
------------
"Gerald Ross" wrote in message
Can't imagine living in a house wrapped and caulked so tight that every time the dog farts your ears pop. Like living in a submarine. So then you need a $3000 snorkel to breathe.
--
Gerald Ross

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That was my forst thought too. Inadequate supply of fresh air to any combustion device /will/ result in the production of Carbon Monoxide. Get yourself a CO alarm pronto.
--
Stuart Winsor

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I've got one out in the garage to monitor the boiler. It went off last spring and told me the boiler really needed cleaned. (It's such a simple process, I'm adding it to the shutdown procedures.)
The same CO detector was in the house when we had a propane water heater. It went off and we got a new water heater. (Now that it's electric, we don't need it in the house.)
Puckdropper
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Stuart wrote:

Here in Los Angeles, the building codes have been revised to require CO monitor in single family residences within the last 6 months..
Lew
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