Just got a planer... Anything I should know?

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"Nonny" wrote:

Here is a neat design for a mobile planer stand in a crowded shop.
http://tinyurl.com/y6jyrl4
Lew
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Don't be suprised when you start to see ridges in the out put results. That is normal and your planer has settled into being a thicknesser as opposed to a short lived thicknesser and finisher. You need to sand afterwards anyway.
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Shucks... I was enjoying the silky smooth output. Will the effect return with a new set of blades? I wouldn't replace the blades to get this effect, just curious.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Yes, it will. I have a Delta two speed and thought it was fantastic for finishing. Until I got some wear on the blades. Still a good finish, but far from the final finish.
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Yes the finish will return with new knives and or resharpened knives. This is not unique to your planer however all planers have this problem. Keep in mind that planers are not finishers, they are thicknessers. To worry about the out put quality is a waste of time. Any thing can and will nick the knives however that does not take away from what the machine was designed to do. As with any material it needs to be scraped or sanded prior to applying a finish. Those ridges will disappear during that process.
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I don't know how others tell when it's time to sharpen planer blades, but my technique was to gently pass my hand over a planed board. If it felt smooth, the blades were OK. If it felt rough or had cross-grain ruts, then it was time for sharp blades.
I never worried much about nicks in the blades, since shifting the knives a tad would wipe them out and I always made a second pass when I'd reached the final thickness, anyway.
To understand the ruts, just think about how the planer knives come down, plunge into the wood, go with the grain and then lift out the chip as the head rotates. If the knives are not sharp, they bounce against the wood or bludgeon their way into it.
--
Nonny
Suppose you were an idiot.
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You need to sharpen the knives when you start to get excess tear out and or the shavings start to have dust mixed in.

Still a waste of time IMHO, finish sanding solves the problem. Unless you are skipping the final sanding... OMG!

If you are talking about the ridges that run across the board a slower feed rate normally takes care of that. When I am running faster feed rates I get the "ruts" but that is going to happen even with brand new blades. Slowing down to 16 fpm makes the surface good enough for finish sanding.
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On Apr 11, 7:28am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Don't try to run an end-grain butcher block through it.
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

One idea I haven't read here yet is for figured woods. Birds eye, squirrely grained wood or any wood where you see a lot of tearout.
Wet (dampen) the surface of the wood with a sponge and let it sit for a minute. Now when you plane it, the tearout will be minimized or be totally gone. Don't make a second pass without re-dampening the wood first.
After you're done, unplug and wipe down the bed and rollers just in case you used to much water. Try it on some scraps, you'll get a feel for how much water and how long to let it sit before running it thru.
There are a lot more tips and hints and most can be found via Google and search back thru the forums.
Bob S.
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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in
*snip*

Hey, did you guys know the exhaust really blows? I put a hose on the output and directed it in to a 5 gallon bucket. Then, I ran a board through... Those planer shavings are just like confetti! I had no idea directing the output to a can like that was such a bad idea!
No wonder the home made chip collectors all had covered cans.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote

I bought my planer one day, then bought the dust collector the next day.
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I used a lunch box planer from 1988 till about 2004 and never used dust collection. I often lost the dog, a chocolate Lab, under the pile of shavings. The new stationary planer had a DC added in 2005.
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On Apr 12, 5:30am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

When you are ready to sharpen your blades don't waste your money on "experts" and do it yourself.
Scroll down to "Planer/Jointer Sharpening" for a cool video on a DIY jig. http://www.garagewoodworks.com/video.php
**No it won't remove large nicks, but I also don't plane wood with nails in them.
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When you are ready to sharpen your blades don't waste your money on "experts" and do it yourself.
Scroll down to "Planer/Jointer Sharpening" for a cool video on a DIY jig. http://www.garagewoodworks.com/video.php
**No it won't remove large nicks, but I also don't plane wood with nails in them.
A dirty board will nick a knife... But I agree with sharpening yourself, if nothing else it saves down time.
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When you are ready to sharpen your blades don't waste your money on "experts" and do it yourself....
I'd just like to second that.
I use a similar setup and I can sharpen a pair of blades faster than it takes to drive 8 miles one-way to the "local expert" who does a so-so job.
I'll add that my jig is *way* more primative than the one shown in the video. Brian has a sweet little jig, but you get by with way less effort than that.
My simplifications are:
* Just a well-fitted slot (TS kerf) rather than clips and brads * No roller. I let the heel slide on my bench next to my granite sink cutout * No height adjustment. The same bevel angle seems to work fine for both my jointer and planer. * I Free-hand the back of the bevel at the bech grinder so I'm really only sandpapering the microbevel
-Steve
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