Just got a bandsaw

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I'm the proud new owner of a Jet 14" bandsaw (This model, but older http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2002049/22892/Jet-14-Closed-Base-Bandsaw - Model-JWBS14CS.aspx). I plan on resawing and cutting rough timber/firewood for drying. What do I need to know about using the saw?
Right now, there is a 3/4" blade on it. A 5/16" blade was included as well.
I had used one back in high school, but it was usually just a turn it on and make a cut operation. There was no thought given to blade tension, guide adjustment other than height, etc.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

1. Get a 1/2" Woodslicer blade https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid ν4947a9805111a1&page=play&residν4947A9805111A1!621
2. Assure wheels are in same plane
3. Adjust tension until blade starts to shimmy, then back off until it stops (doing so)
4. Adjust upper wheel tilt if blade does not ride on or near the crown.
5. Set upper and lower guides just aft of teeth; adjust back bearing a RCH back of the blade.
6. Saw
7. Reduce tension until you next need to saw
Note that wood is going to drift when ripping/resawing; i.e., the wood will want to go through the blade at an angle. That is normal.
--

dadiOH
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What are you linking to? *snip*

Is reducing tension, say two or three twists on the tensioning knob sufficient, or should I release it as much as I can?
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

One of the very best resaw blades for small bandsaws. No idea how that URL got there, this is the correct one http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/woodslicer-resaw-bandsaw-blades.aspx
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I make it good and floppy...about 2 1/2 full turns. Just do the same each time so you can retension it by reversing the number of turns.
--

dadiOH
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On 7/12/11 11:14 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Just for the sake of discussion... There's a camp that says practicing this procedure actually decreases the life of the blade, because it accelerates the work hardening of the metal. Tension, release, tension, release, tension, release, over and over again acts like the old bending a paper clip until it breaks illustration.
--

-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

Since this is just for the sake of discussion: The effects from adding and releasing the tension of the blame seem (to me) utterly trivial compared to the work hardening that is done when the blade moves, like a pulley, around the BS wheels when the saw is running. You could pull (and release) both ends of a straight piece of wire all year and I don't think it would any the worse for wear. This may be related to steel having a high tensile-strength, but I don't think this accounts for the wear concerned with here.
The spot on the blade where it is welded may more likely give in a repeated tension-release cycle. I do not know enough to know.
Bill
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On Tue, 12 Jul 2011 11:56:26 -0500, -MIKE- wrote:

That may be true or not, but I suspect the blade would get dull before that causes a break. At least I've never had one break. Maybe I'm discarding them too soon :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On 7/12/2011 11:41 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

I would have to agree, a blade changes tension all the time during operation, it expands when it warms up and contracts when it cools off.
That said, my wife had a blade break on her while cutting 1/8" thick "card board". Go figger.
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"Leon" wrote in message
On 7/12/2011 11:41 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

I would have to agree, a blade changes tension all the time during operation, it expands when it warms up and contracts when it cools off.
That said, my wife had a blade break on her while cutting 1/8" thick "card board". Go figger.
----------------------
The blade bends and straightens every time it goes over a pulley and then through the cutting zone. I doubt a little tension change does more than that.
mike
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On 12 Jul 2011 15:41:40 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

The purpose of reducing the tension is to eliminate the blade putting pressure on, and creating grooves in, the tires prematurely. Therefore, you would need to release as much as you can until the blade is completely loose.
As far as the tension is concerned I have noticed no difference when the adjustment is off a few turns one way or the other. Others may comment on their experience on that aspect.
Happy sawing.
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On 7/12/2011 12:53 PM, Gordon Shumway wrote:

My BS has had full tension on it for 35 years. I'd bet money the guy I bought it off of did not release the tension in the 27 years he had it either. I replaced the tires when I bought it because they looked old and crackled. Not saying not to release tension, but, just saying.
My blade of choice is a 3/16th inch skip tooth blade I use for everything, including cutting fire wood and resawing. If my tires lasted 35 years with mostly narrow blades, I would think a fat 1/2 or 3/4" blade would do even less damage to the tires, if that's possible.
My saw tracks 100% perfecto, never needs adjusted other than when changing blades.

Also my experience. I adjust tension until I think it feels right, and for past 35 years, it's been pretty right, far as I can tell. I ignore the blade tension gauge completely.
I think another reason, (that I've ignored) is the spring. If you keep tension on the spring, I guess the spring could lose it's spring? The spring helps keep blades from breaking I reckon, but I don't break even skinny blades, so that's been a non-issue to me as well.
--
Jack
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Buy or make a handle to replace the knob. I just take four turns off and put them back on when I'm going to cut again.
I also use a 1/2" woodslicer for resawing. Suites my needs.
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I had the impression that wider was better for resawing. Is there a reason to prefer a 1/2" Woodslicer over a 3/4" Woodslicer?
--
Drew Lawson What would Brian Boitano do?

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If the saw you have can tension a 3/4" blade then the 3/4 would be preferable for resawing. The trouble is that despite what the advertising for the saw says, most small saws are at the edge of their capacity with a 3/4 inch blade.
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writes:

I am finding out just how much of my saw is "most saws". It seems the design has been copied (with varing degrees of quality) by many different companies. I've got a Powermatic riser kit ordered that should fit my Jet saw.
Tensioning a 3/4" blade with the top knob on my saw is difficult to say the least. The knob is too small to provide a good grip, let alone excellent tension. (I found a replacement kit for $15 that should work much better.)
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper says...

Just a suggestionm, if you haven't already done something similar--pull out the tension assembly and work some paste wax into the screw thread then wipe it off. Once it dries it won't pick up dust like grease would, and it makes the mechanism work much more smoothly.
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I assume you'd have to wash all the grease out first. With such "fixes" I always wonder why the manufacturer didn't do that, if it's such a good idea.
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On 7/14/2011 8:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote: Snip

Consider most BS's are built in a China related country and using two lubricants would affect the cost of the machine. Easier to squirt everything with grease than to pay attention to details.
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Ok, what's your Laguna use?
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On 7/15/2011 7:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Not sure exactly however there was nothing caked up anywhere on the machine. They recommend a Teflon lubricant so I use a product called Triflon. I have only had to apply it once or twice in the last 4 or so years.
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