Just bought a new diamond bench stone but...

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I just bought a course/extra course DMT 8" bench stone. However, on the Extra course side there are two small holes drilled on the sharpening surface in the plastic near each end! I have never seen this before. Do you think this is a defect or is there some purpose for it? I have purchased from this line before but never an extra course and thought maybe it was for some purpose, because they are very obvious and cleanly drilled. Any ideas?
Bob
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To hang on a nail?
On 20 Nov 2003 08:15:24 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@operamail.com (Bob) wrote:

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My wife spoke to the rep at DMT and apparently that is the way all new stones will be. They are cutting costs by not filling in the holes from the moulding process (from what I have gathered). The holes are right smack dab on the face of the plate. I mean, how much money are we talking about here?!? They claim it will not affect the performance of the stone. But, I bought this one specifically to flatten my waterstones on, now Ill have to flush each deep little hole out. Not too big a deal true-- but wow what a weird way for them to cut costs! They are probably going to have to field hundreds of calls on this wasting more money than they save with the .0002 cents worth of plastic. I am dumbfounded. Anyone here from DMT to shed more light on this move? My recommendation- demote the the guy who came up with the idea. Bob
(Bob) wrote:

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Why? It won't affect the flattening in any way. Nor honing, unless the tool is small enough to fall into the pit.

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Seems those would fall off the metal grid anyway. Well, there's always some reason for brand "B" over "A," so get a full metal plate for your hooks. I've never given an awl more than a quick trip across a concrete slab to sharpen it.

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On Fri, 21 Nov 2003 17:19:42 -0500, "George"

Ye've brought up a memory, George.
Of my Grandfather, who, when presented with what was, to him, an inadequately sharpened carving knife, would go to the front stoop, and, picking out the most deformed red brick of the bunch ("It's the rounded one's that does the best for ya, Tommy.") would proceed to wet said brick with water (or, if no one was looking, with spit) and apply the knife edge to the stone.
The knife got remarkably sharp.
I believe that the spit was washed off.
Though I am not sure.
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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Only works well with common brick, though. Spit runs right off a vitrified surface....

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Well, I don't like holes in my sharpening stones so I'll buy someone else's. Used to like DMT but then that was last year.
On 20 Nov 2003 17:18:45 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@operamail.com (Bob) wrote:

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On 20 Nov 2003 08:15:24 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@operamail.com (Bob) brought forth from the murky depths:

That's "Coarse", Bob.

After seeing your followup, I agree: Demote the turd who suggested that to them. One doesn't leave flaws in a $60-$100 item on purpose.
-- SAVE THE PARROTS! Eschew the use of poly! ---------- http://diversify.com Poly-free Website Development
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scribbled

No it's not. How many times do I have to remind you:
The correct spelling accepted in rec.woodworking for some words are: joiner, planner, scrapper, rabbit, tennon, hobbiest, course (not fine), bisket, popular (Liriodendron tulipifera), cyprus (Taxodium distichum), tounge & grove (tongue is a finishing oil), radio alarm saw (tmLJ).
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" twice in reply address for real email address
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

Nup. Got that wrong I think. Isn't it "tendon?"
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On Fri, 21 Nov 2003 08:06:03 -0500, Silvan

Nope. You're wrong. DAGS. Tennon is much more commonly used. OK, since C-less piped in too, that makes two of you wrong. :-)
Looking at another of your posts, I realized I need to add "wracking" to the list. :-)
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

And "cheep".
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Nova wrote:

I'll give everybody cheep, as in cheeeeeeeeep or cheep cheep cheep... That dates back to the Maximum Drift BBS, about 14 million years ago.
I don't quite get "wracking" though. When have I said that?
I spelled "definately" that way for years and years before somebody pointed it out to me, so if I'm saying "wracking" by accident in some context, point it out and I'll try to stop it. My ideal is to keep my improper spellings a conscious choice for humorous effect, not to look like a dunderhead who can't splee.
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Wrack means to cause the destruction of. As applied to woodworking, diagonal stress which destroys right angle joints. Now you may argue that putting your bookcase on the rack would tear it apart, but others would remind you of an idiomatic usage meaning to get your balls together....

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On Sat, 22 Nov 2003 12:54:13 -0500, "George"

It is interesting to note ( tho perhaps not) that the that Old English form of "Wreck' was "Wrack."
Although current usage suggests that we may "Rack our brains", it's antecedent still allows us to be called "The Wrack."
Which is sometimes fitting, or so I think.
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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On Sat, 22 Nov 2003 11:05:18 -0500, Silvan

http://groups.google.com/groups?q=wracking+group:rec.woodworking+author:silvan&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&selm \tu81-5rd.ln1%40giganator.family.lan&rnum=1&filter=0
But you're in good company with Charlie Self & Tom Watson (who have spelled it both ways). DAGS. I believe "nerve-wracking" is a correct variant, but to refer to something as out of square or twisted, or the forces that do that is "racking".

At first, I thought the "wracking" spelling was wrong, but given all the other posts, I am starting to have doubts. My Shorter Oxford is of no help. The full page of definitions for "rack" does not once mention twisting. Neither do the definitions of "wrack". My theory is that the WWing use of racking is related to rack, as in torture implement, as opposed to wrack/rack/wreck implying destruction. But who knows.
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wrack1
wrack also rack (rak) noun
1. Destruction or ruin.
2. A remnant or vestige of something destroyed.
[Middle English, from Old English wrc, punishment (influenced by Middle Dutch wrak, shipwreck).]
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

Hmmm... <flips through various dictionaries>
Touch.
I wonder where I got the idea that it was "wracking?"
Oh well, I'll try to behave.
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