Just Bought a Bandsaw - Have Some Questions

Greetings,
I apologize in advance for the length of this post, but I figured it was better to provide as much information up front so that anyone who replies won't have to spend time asking for info I should have included to begin with.
Background: I've considered purchasing a band saw for about two years. It's the last big piece of woodworking equipment I need to round out my shop. For the past year I've been doing some research on and off here at the 'Wreck, on the Web, and several WW mags (the Oct 04 American Woodworker in particular). I decided the Delta 14" closed-base saw (28-206) with a riser block was best suited to my needs and my wallet.
My Needs: Mainly resawing 2" to 8" wide hardwood (10" max, as that is the max width my jointer/planer will handle). Secondary uses will be cutting the occasional arch for Mission/Craftsman Style furniture and possibly the side faces on tenons - very simple stuff. I know that resawing 8-10" boards with a 1hp motor is pushing its limit, but I'm a patient man. I don't have to resaw 100 feet of wood a day (more like 20 feet every 3 or 4 months), so I don't mind a slower feed rate. I don't mind spending a couple of days tweaking the saw or performing upgrades, but I also didn't want to make it my full-time hobby for six weeks either. (Video Doctor's "Fettling a Delta 14" Chinese Bandsaw" page is a great tweaking resource - http://www.thevideodoc.com/pbandsaw1.htm )
My Wallet: I wanted to come in at the $650 range with upgrades/accessories.
(In case anyone was wondering, I've ruled out any Jet equipment altogether. In short, I had a minor problem with one of my two Jet machines, and Jet's Customer Service department treated me like a vagrant. But that's a story for another thread. End result: I'll never buy another piece of Jet equipment again.)
I found the 28-206 on sale about two weeks ago for $475 + $90 for the riser block. That leaves me about $85 for upgrades. After doing my research, these were the upgrades I was planning to install in order of priority.
Timberwolf 1/2 x 3tpi Blade - $25. I used the same blade, shorter length, on another band saw and was pleased with the results. Since this will be the saw's primary function, I wanted to set it up for success. This is also a low tension blade.
Mobile Base - $0. I have a "universal" Delta mobile base I can use.
Cool Blocks - $12. Phenolic blocks appear to be the best value when replacing the factory guides. At first, the Delta factory guide blocks looked like they might be plastic, but a quick test with a magnet showed me they weren't. The AWW article provided some helpful comparisons for guide replacements. I have also been eyeing some cheap roller-bearing guides (~$16) on eBay.
PowerTwist V-Link Belt - $22. Should decrease vibration by mitigating whatever misalignment is left between the pulleys and the effect of v-belt shape "memory". I decided to go with the PowerTwist versus the cheaper Accu-Link; the Accu-Link looked like it would disintegrate faster. Jim Wilson's Link Belt Page (http://www.paragoncode.com/shop/link_belts /) was an invaluable source of information on these.
Urethane Band Saw Tires - $22. I'm not entirely sure these are necessary as I have yet to measure the runout on the factory tires. The factory tires look VERY similar to the urethane tires Rockler is selling (http://www.rockler.com/findit.cfm?page=5838 ). Does anyone know if Delta has recently started shipping their band saws with URETHANE tires installed?!?!
Other upgrades I've considered but am not planning to buy:
Iturra High Tension Spring - $17. I didn't see this as necessary, particularly since the Timberwolf blade is of the low tension variety. Then again, the riser block takes the blade length to 105" so I may have to bite the bullet on this one.
Zero-Clearance Inserts - $10 for 4. I'm not sure tearout is going to be a big problem with resawing.
So far, my upgrade total comes to $81, so I'm still within my budget. Now, for the questions:
1. Of the upgrades I've listed, are there any I should reconsider (priority, brand, type, etc.)?
2. Are there any other upgrades I missed and should consider?
TIA for the replies, guys. Being relatively new to this band saw gig, I definitely appreciate any help or guidance you can offer.
Chop
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vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
Mark Duginske's The Bandsaw Handbook

--
Only worry about the things you can control.

Then you have stuff all to worry about!
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Greetings,
weeks either. (Video Doctor's "Fettling a Delta 14" Chinese Bandsaw" page is a great tweaking resource - http://www.thevideodoc.com/pbandsaw1.htm )
I cannot get to that link. Could you recheck its validity from your end?
Bob
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On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 14:13:44 GMT, "Bob"

Even with the ) removed, it doesn't ping through this morning. The server is offline for some reason. Maybe they're updating software today.
============================================================= Like peace and quiet? Buy a phoneless cord. http://www/diversify.com/stees.html Hilarious T-shirts online =============================================================
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wrote:

Blades are not upgrades, they are consumables. Don't even consider them in the cost of the saw acquisition. Consider them in the cost of operating the saw--much like electricity. You wouldn't consider electricity as part of the saw's cost that you're totting up, would you? Besides, you're going to own more than one blade before you're done.
Moreover, I wouldn't lump any of those other things in the acquisition cost, either. They, any or all, can be done at any time after you get the saw, and thus can be financed out of your slush fund on an ad hoc basis. You do have a slush fund, don't you?
Your $650 should be allocated solely to getting a machine in the door and cutting wood. Remember, this is a hobby. You can't/shouldn't acquire tools on an accounting basis--that is, justifying each purchase on its "total cost," etc.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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necessary as I have yet to measure the runout on the factory tires. The factory tires look VERY similar to the urethane tires Rockler is selling (http://www.rockler.com/findit.cfm?pageX38 ). Does anyone know if Delta has recently started shipping their band saws with URETHANE tires installed?!?!
Don't waste your money until they need to be replaced. My Delta has never had the tires replaced and it's 20 years old and gets used every day. Your Delta with a 3 TPI blade will handle your needs.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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wrote:

snip snip snip..... =========================Honestly I NEVER even think about Purchasing addons or accesories until after I have used the tool for a few months...and then only after tweaking the tool to solve any problems that I encounter...
Get the saw home.. Play with it.... then start thinking of what things you NEED or may WANT (2 different things) ...to purchase for the machine...
Just my opinion...
Bob Griffiths
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Blades are consumables as mentioned. I am not a bandsaw nerd but the ones I have used worked just ok enough with plain old v belts. My 20 year old tires on my Delta metal/wood bandsaw seem to work ok. For resaw you may be getting out your Record 4 plane to smooth the wood up anyway. Zero clearance insert, for resaw? The stock spring I have seems to work ok. Coolblocks or bearings I can see value in. If iwas blowing $85 I would blow it on blade bearings. Really I would by some wood.
A lot of stuff is made because people find a minor problem and create a solution. You may have never discovered you had "problem" if you had not read some magizine or sales catalogue.

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Get a Quik-Crank for adjusting tension. Also good for releasing tension when done for the day. I just take five turns off every time and put them back when I'm going to use the saw again. It is about $30.
Skip the tires until yours are worn.
I don't consider blades an upgrade, just another consumablel you need every now and again. I like the Timberwolf, I've used the Woodslicer but still prefer the Timberwolf. Just bought a Lee Valley Viking 1/4" blade but have not tried it yet. Ed http://pages.cthome.net/edhome /
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wrote:

Has anyone tried the $10 BC Saw blades that FWW liked?
We're getting a group order together at work, so I may be the guinea pig. <G>
Barry
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I wrote you up a long novel and then my daughter slammed something on my keyboard and it vanished. Since then, most of what I had to say was said by others....consumables...use the saw as is for a while..... Timber Wolf aka Viking at Lee Valley....Get Mark Duginskes book....
Additionally, I would recommend you call Iturra Design and get their (his) catalog by Louis Iturra. He basically wrote a novel around the bandsaw and marketed some of his wares within it. Phone number is (888)722-7076. Louis will speak to you personally and give you lots of good advice. I have talked with him a couple of times and he seems to be a great guy. In it he compares Old vs New Delta, Delta vs Jet, etc.
Thing I would recommend: eventually get a magnetic starter for it, cobble up some dust collection, ljjl
Here she comes again. i better hit send. (15mth old) hard to type now. Eric
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Blades aren't "upgrades", as others mentioned.
The cool blocks work better than the stock guides.
Consider trying a WoodSlicer blade instead of the TW.
Have fun with your new toy!
David
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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This is going to duplicate what a lot of other people said, but consider it more support.
I don't have a table saw, only a band saw, so I use mine a lot.
I would seriously consider NOT getting a riser block. I have one and I have considered taking it off. The riser reduces throat capacity of the saw. For me, the number of times the resaw height is over 6" is about the same number of times that the throat capacity is an issue, so it's kind of a toss up. Also remember that the riser makes the blade tension knob 6" higher. If are aren't very tall, that may be an issue. Whatever you decide, it's difficult to switch because you have to get all new blades.
Blades are consumable. Timberwolf blades are overpriced. Try carbide.com or bcsaw.com. There was a recent article in FWW by Mike Dunbar in which he said he always uses a 3 tpi blade. I use a 4 tpi bi-metal blade for nearly everything. I recently cut a bunch of dovetails using the bandsaw and I was switching blades to one with really fine teeth. After reading the article, I decided to try my 4 tpi blade and it worked fine. That's all to say that for the tasks you have described a 3 or 4 tpi blade would be fine. I wouldn't even consider bi-metal or carbide until you wear out a blade.
Cool blocks -- I think they help especially when learning because they are more forgiving on the blade. As far as I can tell, the roller guides don't improve anything over cool blocks and are much more likely to damage the blade.
Link belt - get it later. I have one, but I'm not sure it makes any difference.
Tires - you definitely do not need to replace those on a new machine.
Tension spring -- you only need to replace if you wear out the existing one. I have a Jet. I ruined by original tension spring by compressing it completely. Don't do that unless you want to buy a new tension spring.
Zero clearance insert -- I've never had one. Doesn't really seem necessary and would probably interfere with dust collection unless you drill holes in it.
One upgrade I consider essential is a replacement for the blade tension crank. Replacing it will greatly improve your bandsaw experience. They sell them at Iturra Designs or Highland Hardware.
Most of all, just remember that the bandsaw is a very simple machine. There seems to be a trend of getting all worried if the wheels are out of plane by 0.001" or the guides are aligned just right. Just get it close and you'll be fine. I recommend Lonnie Bird's book because it's well written and that's basically the approach he takes.
Mark
Greetings,
I apologize in advance for the length of this post, but I figured it was better to provide as much information up front so that anyone who replies won't have to spend time asking for info I should have included to begin with.
Background: I've considered purchasing a band saw for about two years. It's the last big piece of woodworking equipment I need to round out my shop. For the past year I've been doing some research on and off here at the 'Wreck, on the Web, and several WW mags (the Oct 04 American Woodworker in particular). I decided the Delta 14" closed-base saw (28-206) with a riser block was best suited to my needs and my wallet.
My Needs: Mainly resawing 2" to 8" wide hardwood (10" max, as that is the max width my jointer/planer will handle). Secondary uses will be cutting the occasional arch for Mission/Craftsman Style furniture and possibly the side faces on tenons - very simple stuff. I know that resawing 8-10" boards with a 1hp motor is pushing its limit, but I'm a patient man. I don't have to resaw 100 feet of wood a day (more like 20 feet every 3 or 4 months), so I don't mind a slower feed rate. I don't mind spending a couple of days tweaking the saw or performing upgrades, but I also didn't want to make it my full-time hobby for six weeks either. (Video Doctor's "Fettling a Delta 14" Chinese Bandsaw" page is a great tweaking resource - http://www.thevideodoc.com/pbandsaw1.htm )
My Wallet: I wanted to come in at the $650 range with upgrades/accessories.
(In case anyone was wondering, I've ruled out any Jet equipment altogether. In short, I had a minor problem with one of my two Jet machines, and Jet's Customer Service department treated me like a vagrant. But that's a story for another thread. End result: I'll never buy another piece of Jet equipment again.)
I found the 28-206 on sale about two weeks ago for $475 + $90 for the riser block. That leaves me about $85 for upgrades. After doing my research, these were the upgrades I was planning to install in order of priority.
Timberwolf 1/2 x 3tpi Blade - $25. I used the same blade, shorter length, on another band saw and was pleased with the results. Since this will be the saw's primary function, I wanted to set it up for success. This is also a low tension blade.
Mobile Base - $0. I have a "universal" Delta mobile base I can use.
Cool Blocks - $12. Phenolic blocks appear to be the best value when replacing the factory guides. At first, the Delta factory guide blocks looked like they might be plastic, but a quick test with a magnet showed me they weren't. The AWW article provided some helpful comparisons for guide replacements. I have also been eyeing some cheap roller-bearing guides (~$16) on eBay.
PowerTwist V-Link Belt - $22. Should decrease vibration by mitigating whatever misalignment is left between the pulleys and the effect of v-belt shape "memory". I decided to go with the PowerTwist versus the cheaper Accu-Link; the Accu-Link looked like it would disintegrate faster. Jim Wilson's Link Belt Page (http://www.paragoncode.com/shop/link_belts /) was an invaluable source of information on these.
Urethane Band Saw Tires - $22. I'm not entirely sure these are necessary as I have yet to measure the runout on the factory tires. The factory tires look VERY similar to the urethane tires Rockler is selling (http://www.rockler.com/findit.cfm?pageX38 ). Does anyone know if Delta has recently started shipping their band saws with URETHANE tires installed?!?!
Other upgrades I've considered but am not planning to buy:
Iturra High Tension Spring - $17. I didn't see this as necessary, particularly since the Timberwolf blade is of the low tension variety. Then again, the riser block takes the blade length to 105" so I may have to bite the bullet on this one.
Zero-Clearance Inserts - $10 for 4. I'm not sure tearout is going to be a big problem with resawing.
So far, my upgrade total comes to $81, so I'm still within my budget. Now, for the questions:
1. Of the upgrades I've listed, are there any I should reconsider (priority, brand, type, etc.)?
2. Are there any other upgrades I missed and should consider?
TIA for the replies, guys. Being relatively new to this band saw gig, I definitely appreciate any help or guidance you can offer.
Chop
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